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Articles on Lynching

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Armed white citizens and police have historically worked together in the U.S., though it’s not clear whether that’s what’s happening here. George Frey/Getty Images

Vigilantism, again in the news, is an American tradition

For many Americans, law and order has long been as much a private matter as something for the government to handle.
Smoke rises from damaged properties after the Tulsa Race Massacre in Tulsa, Oklahoma June 1921. Oklahoma Historical Society via Getty Images

From grandfather to grandson, the lessons of the Tulsa race massacre

More Americans are learning about the 1921 massacre in the prosperous black section of Tulsa known as the 'Black Wall Street.' For Gregory Fairchild, it is a part of his family history.
Ahmaud Arbery’s best friend, right, and his sister speak at a memorial event for Arbery on May 9, 2020. Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Why cellphone videos of black people’s deaths should be considered sacred, like lynching photographs

The US has a centuries-old tradition of killing black people without repercussion – and of publicly viewing the violence. Spreading those images can disrespect the dead and traumatize viewers.
A leader of the Three Percenters militia movement, Matt Marshall, speaks at an anti-lockdown protest, April 19, 2020 in Olympia, Washington. Getty/Karen Ducey

There’s a history of white supremacists interpreting government leaders’ words as encouragement

White supremacists' protests against COVID-19 lockdowns reflect the US history of political leaders encouraging white supremacist groups to challenge or overthrow democratic governments.
A funeral held in July 1945 for two victims of the Ku Klux Klan, George Dorsey and his sister, Dorothy Dorsey Malcolm, of Walton County, Georgia, held at the Mt. Perry Baptist Church Sunday. Bettman via Getty

Lynching preachers: How black pastors resisted Jim Crow and white pastors incited racial violence

Religion was no barrier for Southern lynch mobs intent on terror. White pastors joined the KKK, incited racial violence and took part in lynchings. Sometimes, the victim was a preacher.
During Super Bowl LIII, will Atlanta’s long struggle for racial equality be highlighted or glossed over? Peter Ciro/flickr

Super Bowl LIII and the soul of Atlanta

The country's 'Black Mecca' is hosting the Super Bowl. With the NFL's national anthem controversy still lingering, this creates an undeniable paradox.
National Memorial for Peace and Justice. AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

Lynching memorial shows women were victims, too

Although fewer black women were lynched in the US than men, their stories have been marginalized. Will a new memorial in Alabama help make their sacrifices known?
Little Rock protest, 1959. Wikimedia/John T. Bledsoe

Uncovering the roots of racist ideas in America

Ignorant and hateful people are not behind the production of racist ideas, as Americans are taught so often during Black History Month.

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