Menu Close

Articles on Neuroscience

Displaying 1 - 20 of 518 articles

The colors in this microscope photo of a fruit fly brain show different types of neurons and the cells that surround them in the brain. Sarah DeGenova Ackerman

Astrocyte cells in the fruit fly brain are an on-off switch that controls when neurons can change and grow

Adaptable neurons are tied to learning and memory but also to neurological disorders. By studying fruit flies, researchers found a mechanism that controls neuroplasticity.
Rhyming means something different in ASL than it does in spoken language. Zed Sevcikova Sehyr

An interactive visual database for American Sign Language reveals how signs are organized in the mind

In American Sign Language, some words rhyme, some look like what they mean and some are used more often than others. A new database of these features paves a pathway for ASL research.
Even young children are very aware of whether they’re getting their fair share. Jupiterimages/PHOTOS.com via Getty Images Plus

Selfish or selfless? Human nature means you’re both

Cognitive neuroscientists use brain imaging and behavioral economic games to investigate people's sense of fairness. They find it's common to take care of yourself before looking out for others.
It’s disconcerting to think the way two people perceive the world might be totally different. Mads Perch/Stone via Getty Images

Do you see red like I see red?

Neuroscientists tackling the age-old question of whether perceptions of color hold from one person to the next are coming up with some interesting answers.
In a divided nation, a little empathy goes a long way. Brent Stirton/Getty Images

The morality of feeling equal empathy for strangers and family alike

Feelings of empathy for others may be plentiful in a year of suffering. But is feeling more empathy to loved ones than strangers morally right? A research team sought to find out.

Top contributors

More