Politics + Society – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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Unas 200 mil mujeres argentinas marcharon el 8 de marzo para el Día Internacional de la Mujer, muchas reclamando la legalización del aborto. AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta

Argentinos empiezan a contemplar los derechos de la mujer, comenzando con el aborto

La posible legalización del aborto en Argentina abre debate sobre temas sociales importantes hasta ahora relegados, como la inequidad salarial, las licencias parentales y la representación política.
President Donald Trump and former FBI Director James Comey. AP Photo/Evan Vucci, left, and Andrew Harnik

Why does a president demand loyalty from people who work for him?

There's a trade-off when presidents appoint loyalists. A loyalist may not be as competent as the position demands, but he or she may satisfy the president by carrying out his agenda.
Macron and Trump, seen here meeting in September 2017, have reportedly developed a good working relationship despite their many ideological differences. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

Macron-Trump summit has high stakes for France’s embattled leader

Trump is rolling out the red carpet for Macron's visit to Washington. But the French president has some tough talks ahead, as the two leaders discuss thorny issues like trade and the Iran deal.
James Comey in 2017. AP Photo/Cliff Owen

What Greek tragedy illuminates about James Comey

Greek tragedies shed light into human nature's darker corners. They can also illuminate the character of former FBI chief James Comey, whose unbending adherence to principles evokes ancient themes.
Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y., accompanied by Democratic members of the House and Senate in late 2017. AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Democratic Party’s pluralism is both a strength and weakness

The Democratic Party is a mishmash of causes and interest groups. The party's future will be determined by how its leaders balance and align the interests of its diverse factions.
Protestors demonstrate inside a Philadelphia Starbucks, where two black men were arrested. REUTERS/Mark Makela

What’s unconscious bias training, and does it work?

Starbucks is giving this training to its employees, but it’s still so new that there's no standard format and little research yet on whether it's effective.
Cuba’s new president, at the National Assembly meeting where he was appointed to succeed Raúl Castro on April 18, 2018. Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters

Cuba’s new president: What to expect of Miguel Díaz-Canel

Cuba has a new president — and for the first time in six decades his last name is not Castro. Who is Miguel Díaz-Canel, the man who inherits a Cuba born of Fidel's 1959 revolution?
Cambodian villagers walk to a courtroom before appeal hearings for two Khmer Rouge senior leaders facing charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. AP Photo/Heng Sinith

A scholar’s journey to understand the needs of Pol Pot’s survivors

Research on profound human suffering requires more than intellectual understanding of legal and political mechanics. It requires a human journey that goes deeply into victims' experiences and needs.
President Donald Trump, left, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Will US-Japan friendship survive uncertainty in Asia?

US-Japan relations are under pressure. As leaders of the two countries meet this week, a scholar tells the story of the exchange program that made such a difference to American attitudes toward Japan.
The Spanish hotel chain Meliá has big plans for Cuba. So did the Trump Organization, up until its CEO was elected president of the United States. Desmond Boylan/Reuters

Before Trump was anti-Cuba, he wanted to open a hotel in Havana

As president, Donald Trump has taken a harsh stance toward Cuba. But his real estate company has tried twice to open Trump properties on the Communist island, allegedly even skirting the law to do so.
A woman holds a Syrian flag during a protest against air strikes on Syria in Baghdad, Iraq on April 15, 2018. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani

US airstrikes in Syria nothing more than theater

Are air strikes really a way to hold the Syrian regime responsible for its alleged atrocities against humanity? History says no.
A Syrian soldier films the damage of the Syrian Scientific Research Center which was attacked by U.S., British and French military strikes. AP Photo/Hassan Ammar

Syria, chemical weapons and the limits of international law

The United Nations Charter doesn't allow the use of military force to prevent chemical weapons attacks — no matter how evil — without UN Security Council approval. That needs to change.
Speaker Ryan is leaving the House. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

What does the Speaker of the House do?

Paul Ryan, the Republican speaker of the House, just announced his retirement, and the race to replace him started before his announcement. What is the speaker's role? How has it changed over history?
Peruvian ceviche doesn’t just taste good — it can be a force for social change. Enrique Castro-Mendivil/Reuters

5 food trends that are changing Latin America

Pioneering chefs from Bolivia to Brazil are stepping out of the kitchen and into public service. The 'social gastronomy' movement uses food to create jobs, prevent violence and boost economies.