Politics + Society – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

Displaying 1 - 25 of 985 articles

A makeshift memorial to the victims of the terrorist attack in Barcelona. Police killed five men August 18 believed to have been involved. AP Photo/Manu Fernandez

Are Islamic State recruits more street gang members than zealots?

With terrorists striking again in Spain and in Finland, one cannot help but ask -- again -- why people want to follow the Islamic State. Some new theories are emerging.
Did Trump’s rhetoric played a part in radicalizing the far-right protesters in Charlottesville? AP Photo/Steve Helber

Charlottesville and the politics of fear

Trump is a master of using anger to motivate his base. An anti-terrorism researcher explains how to stem the tide.
Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro (center) attends a graduation of National Armed Forces. Miraflores Palace/Handout via REUTERS

How much longer will Maduro’s grip on power last? Look to the military

The loyalty of Venezuela’s soldiers is getting shaky. History shows from the Arab Spring to Latin American coups, when the military withdraws support for a leader, a fall from power is imminent.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is applauded at a performance in Pyongyang. KRT via AP Video

Disarming North Korea means making concessions

A former Department of Defense and State Department official explains why a hardline approach on North Korea will likely fail, as it did with Iran.
People fleeing on bullock carts as mass migration happened during the partition. AP Photo

The road to India’s partition

At midnight on August 15, 1947, India achieved freedom from more than two centuries of colonial rule. Hours earlier, Pakistan was declared a new nation. Was partition inevitable?
Images of Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are shown on a news program in Seoul, South Korea on Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017. AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

Why didn’t sanctions stop North Korea’s missile program?

The international community has been trying to stop North Korea from developing long-range missiles for decades. So how did North Korea get them?
Is there really a strong division between folks like Brexit leader Farage and global citizens Bill Gates and Canadian PM Justin Trudeau? REUTERS/Peter Nicholls, Geoff Robins

Rise in globalism doesn’t mean the end for nationalists

Data show that many people who consider themselves ‘global citizens’ also harbor strong national sentiments. The two aren’t mutually exclusive.
Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard is removed from the entrance to City Park in New Orleans. REUTERS/Cheryl Gerber

What to do with Confederate statues?

A scholar of southern politics finds inspiration in an unexpected place.
Grounds of Hand Up Ministries in Oklahoma City houses sex offenders. AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

Are sex offender registries reinforcing inequality?

Beginning in the 1990s, all 50 US states and Washington, DC created public sex offender registries. Do they do more to help or hurt?
LGBT veterans march in a Boston parade. Contrary to what some may say, the military has a long history of embracing socially marginalized groups. AP Photo/Steven Senne

The military, minorities and social engineering: A long history

Whether it be African-Americans, Catholics or transgender people, the armed forces have played a vital role in shaping US social policy toward the country's minorities.
Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks to the students on July 21, 2017. Alexei Nikolsky/via AP

Imagining Russia post-Putin

Stepping back from the current crisis in US-Russia relations, a Soviet expert asks: what's in store for Russia in the long term, and is a peaceful transition possible when Putin's gig is up?
A Kansas voter prepares to cast her ballot – and prove her identity – in the 2014 midterm elections. AP Photo/Charlie Riedel

Kris Kobach and Kansas’ SAFE Act

As Kansas' secretary of state, Kobach drafted the nation's most restrictive voter ID law.