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Articles on Central American migrants

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An undocumented immigrant who has lived in the U.S. for 28 years shows a picture of her grandchild and son, who was deported under Trump’s ‘zero tolerance’ policy in 2017. John Moore/Getty Images

Severed families, raided workplaces and a climate of fear: Assessing Trump’s immigration crackdown

Trump made three anti-immigration pledges in 2016: ban Muslims, build a wall and enforce all immigration laws. Four years on, a migration scholar examines his record – and its effect on the country.
The pandemic and anti-immigration policies haven’t stopped migration from Central America – they’ve just made conditions at the border more hazardous. Herika Martinez/AFP via Getty Images

Migrant caravans restart as pandemic deepens the humanitarian crisis at the US-Mexico border

COVID-19 has created new hardships for migrants while giving the Trump administration an excuse to further restrict asylum as public attention focuses on the pandemic.
Street gangs that operate with impunity make El Salvador one of the world’s most violent countries. Few murders are ever solved. MARVIN RECINOS/AFP via Getty Images

Deported to death: US sent 138 Salvadorans home to be killed

A new Human Rights Watch report finds many Salvadoran deportees are killed once home, often by the gangs they fled. Rampant impunity means El Salvador can't protect vulnerable people from violence.
In this April 2019 photo, migrants planning to join a caravan of several hundred people hoping to reach the United States wait at the bus station in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. (AP Photo/Delmer Martinez)

The role of Canadian mining in the plight of Central American migrants

Canada is playing a role in the life-and-death struggle for migrant justice in the United States -- from our foreign economic policies to the actions of our mining companies and domestic asylum laws.
Honduran migrant Vicky Chavez with her daughter Issabella on May 31, 2018 in the First Unitarian Church in Salt Lake City, where she sought protection from deportation in late 2017. AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

More Central American migrants take shelter in churches, recalling 1980s sanctuary movement

The number of migrants living in churches has spiked recently in anticipation of threatened immigration raids, but churches have long protected refugees in an act of faith-based civil disobedience.
In this June 2019 photo, Central American migrants wait for the departure of a northbound freight train in Palenque, Mexico. The Mexican crackdown on migrants prompted by pressure from the Trump administration has pushed Central American migrants to seek new ways to try to reach the U.S. border. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

Canada must not be complicit in the U.S. assault on Central American refugees

Canada should stand up for international law by condemning the American assault on Central American migrants.
A member of Mexico’s National Guard watches for migrants on the Rio Suchiate between Guatemala and Mexico at sunrise on July 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Idalia Rie)

As Mexico appeases Trump, migrants bear the brunt

The U.S. will likely continue to threaten Mexico with trade tariffs due to Central American migrants, and Mexico will respond with more drastic, inhumane measures. None of it will stop migration.
Sandra Torres, presidential candidate for the National Unity of Hope, won the first round of presidential election in Guatemala with 25% of the vote, followed by former national prison director Alejandro Giammatei. The two will face-off in the second round of voting in August. Reuters/Luis Echeverria

Corruption triumphs in Guatemala’s presidential election

For their next president, Guatemalans must choose between two veteran politicians with shady pasts and alleged ties to organized crime.
Under a new deal between the U.S. and Mexico, Mexico will send 6,000 troops to its southern border with Guatemala to prevent migrants from continuing their northward journey toward the United States. Reuters/Jose Torres

Migrants will pay the price of Mexico’s tariff deal with Trump

Mexico says it emerged from tariff negotiations in Washington with its 'dignity intact.' But that dignity comes at great cost to the migrants fleeing extreme violence in Central America.
Migrants on a ship intercepted offshore near the Libyan town of Gohneima, east of the capital Tripoli, in July 2018. Libyan Coast Guard via AP, File

Europe’s refugee crisis explains why border walls don’t stop migration

After 1.3 million migrants from the Middle East and Africa came to Europe in 2015, many countries built fences or closed their ports. That has pushed migrants to take riskier routes into the EU.
Salvadoran immigrants were pivotal in the Justice for Janitors campaign in Los Angeles in 1990. It earned wage increases for custodial staff nationwide and inspired today’s $15 minimum wage campaign. AP Photo/Chris Pizzello

How Central American migrants helped revive the US labor movement

Central Americans who came to the US in the 1980s fleeing civil war drew on their background fighting for social justice back home to help unionize farmworkers, janitors and poultry packers in the US.
One of 2018’s unforgettable images: Maria Meza and her twin daughters sprint from tear gas lobbed at the border wall between the U.S and Mexico in Tijuana, Nov. 25, 2018. Reuters/Kim Kyung Hoon

Remembering the caravan: 5 essential reads that show the desperation of Central American migrants

The migrant caravan was one of the biggest international stories of 2018, a roving human drama that laid bare Central America's pain for all the world to see.
Members of the migrant caravan, mostly Hondurans, cross a river that separates Guatemala and Mexico. EPA/Esteban Biba

Origins and implications of the caravan of Honduran migrants

Honduran migrants trudging north towards the US-Mexico border are fleeing violence and poverty that has its roots in activities of 10th-century American fruit companies.
Central American migrants face extortion, robbery, assault, kidnapping, rape and murder on their weeks-long journey through Mexico. Some find safety in numbers. AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Migrants travel in groups for a simple reason: safety

More than two-thirds of Central American migrants will experience violence on their journey through Mexico, from robbery and extortion to rape. Caravans create safety in numbers.

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