Articles on Chicago

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A team photograph of the 1919 Chicago White Sox squad, many of whom would be implicated in throwing that year’s World Series. Heritage Auctions

How gambling built baseball – and then almost destroyed it

Up until the 1919 Black Sox Scandal, gambling and baseball had a marriage of convenience. A century later, gambling is again being seen as a solution to the sport's woes.
Contact with nature reduces stress and aggression, one reason scholars say urban green space may reduce violence. Shutterstock

Can parks help cities fight crime?

Some parks reduce violence in the local vicinity. Other parks attract crime. The difference has to do with how these urban green spaces are designed, programmed and managed, experts say.
Despite being known for high college acceptance rates, Urban Prep Academies recently lost a charter to operate a school on Chicago’s west side. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Chicago’s Urban Prep Academy – known for 100% college acceptance rates – put reputation ahead of results

Urban Prep Academy in Chicago made a name by boasting about its 100% college acceptance rates for graduating seniors. A founding teacher at Urban Prep explains why that statistic is misleading.
Public bikes are meant to complement a city’s existing mass transit network, so the location of docking stations is critical. MusikAnimal/Wikimedia

Chicago, New York discounted most public input in expanding bike systems

Under 10 percent of new Citi Bike and Divvy bike docks are sited where residents suggested using interactive online maps, a new study shows. But that doesn't mean city officials weren't listening.
Chicago is often invoked in political debates on crime. Scott Cornell/shutterstock.com

Why the US needs better crime reporting statistics

What's really the most dangerous American city? The way crimes are currently counted in the US can easily confuse and mislead.
In Los Angeles, the architecture firm KTGY is repurposing shipping containers to build a transitional apartment complex for the homeless. KTGY

Architecture in 2018: Look to the streets, not the sky

Three innovative projects set to be completed this year are geared toward strengthening communities that have been left out of the economic recovery.
A photograph of Penn Station’s interior from the 1930s. Bernice Abbott

Remembering America’s lost buildings

We asked five architecture experts to name one building or structure they wish had been preserved, but couldn't resist the tides of decay, development and discrimination.
Back in the 1930s, people like this pear peddler in New York City’s Lower East Side often got their news from labor-led media. AP Photo

The backstory behind the unions that bought a Chicago Sun-Times stake

The newspaper's new owners harken back to a tradition of labor-led media in the early part of the 20th century, which represented a bulwark against corporate power.
On the left, Katsushika Hokusai’s ‘The Manifestation of the Peak’ (1834); on the right, Wright’s rendering of the Huntington Hartford Resort project (1947) © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Taliesin West, Scottsdale, AZ

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Japanese education

When the young Wright moved to Chicago to work for the architect Joseph Silsbee, he was introduced to Japanese prints. It changed his career, and very possibly the course of American architecture.

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