Articles on Cities

Displaying 1 - 20 of 1312 articles

A demonstrator heads to an anti-violence protest in Chicago, which has struggled with gun violence for decades, July 7, 2018. Jim Young/AFP via Getty Images)

Faith-based ‘violence interrupters’ stop gang shootings with promise of redemption for at-risk youth – not threats of jail

Gun violence has killed hundreds of Americans, including kids, this summer. There are proven ways to bring peace to city streets, says an expert in violence prevention – but someone has to pay for it.
Residents of Denver’s Five Points neighborhood protest in 2017 outside a coffee shop that posted a sign celebrating gentrification. Patrick Traylor/The Denver Post via Getty Images

In changing urban neighborhoods, new food offerings can set the table for gentrification

Hip food offerings can signal that a neighborhood is gentrifying – especially when they repackage traditional foods for wealthy white eaters.
Situated on a plateau and surrounded by mountains, Mexico City – seen here in a haze on May 20, 2018 – is a ‘bowl’ that traps smog and dust. AP Photo/Marco Ugarte

Mexico City buried its rivers to prevent disease and unwittingly created a dry, polluted city where COVID-19 now thrives

The Aztecs had a shining city on a lake, with canals, causeways and aqueducts – until the Spanish came. Mexico City is still suffering the consequences of their bad public health decisions.
Harvest Kitchen restaurant, on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, making use of New York City’s new policy of opening streets to walking, biking and dining. Ron Adar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

New York opens traffic-clogged streets to people during pandemic, the city’s latest redesign in times of dramatic change

First trains, then cars and, now, COVID-19 have all spurred New York to reimagine how its scarce space should be used – and what residents need to survive.
San Francisco mayor London Breed declaring a shelter-in-place order early in the coronavirus pandemic, March 17, 2020. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

America’s Black female mayors face dual crises of COVID-19 and protests – but these women are used to uphill battles

Four decades after Ellen Craig-Jones of Urbancrest, Ohio, became the US's first Black woman mayor, seven of the nation's largest cities are lead by Black women. And what a time to be in charge.
Cities can prepare for climate change emergencies by adding green spaces to help manage stormwater, heat stress and air quality. (Shutterstock)

How cities can add accessible green space in a post-coronavirus world

The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted the lack of green space available to those living in urban areas. Cities must be managed as ecosystems to make them more liveable and resilient.
Nurses and other health care workers in New York mourned colleagues who have died during the outbreak of the novel coronavirus. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Coronavirus deaths in San Francisco vs. New York: What causes such big differences in cities’ tolls?

Why one city suffers significantly more deaths than another isn't always obvious. A simple experiment shows how failing to consider certain factors can point policy makers in the wrong direction.
Some of the highest coronavirus hospitalization rates in Denver are in neighborhoods near Valverde, a community that was once redlined. RJ Sangosti/Denver Post via Getty Images

Is your neighborhood raising your coronavirus risk? Redlining decades ago set communities up for greater danger

Neighborhood characteristics like pollution from busy roads, widespread public transit use and lack of community-based health care are putting certain communities at greater risk from COVID-19.
New York City has closed some streets to traffic to give residents more room to roam during the coronavirus pandemic, Queens, May 13, 2020. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

How pandemics have changed American cities – often for the better

For centuries, disease outbreaks have forced cities to transform physically and operationally in ways that ultimately benefited all residents going forward.
A market area in Dhaka, the Bangladeshi capital, crowded with people despite the coronavirus pandemic, May 12, 2020. hmed Salahuddin/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Megacity slums are incubators of disease – but coronavirus response isn’t helping the billion people who live in them

COVID-19 is spreading fast through not only the world's richest cities but also its poorest, ravaging slum areas where risk factors like overcrowding and poverty accelerate disease transmission.

Top contributors

More