Articles on Climate Explained

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Many developed countries already have significant waste-to-energy operations and therefore less material going to landfill.

Climate explained: seven reasons to be wary of waste-to-energy proposals

Burning non-recyclable waste to generate energy sounds like a great idea – but incineration plants need an ongoing waste stream to be viable, which perpetuates the make-use-dispose mentality.
Many temperate crops require winter chilling to initiate flowering or fruit ripening, and orchards may need to shift to colder areas. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: how climate change will affect food production and security

New Zealand is a net exporter of many fruit and vegetables. While climate-change induced food shortages are not an imminent risk, some crops may be affected by rising temperatures and extreme weather.
Planes can create clouds of tiny ice crystals, called contrails, and some studies suggest they could have an a significant effect on climate. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: how much does flying contribute to climate change?

Globally, emissions from air travel account for only about 3% of the warming human activities are causing, but aviation affects our climate in a number of ways.
The best way to compare emissions from electric cars is to assess all phases of a life cycle analysis. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: the environmental footprint of electric versus fossil cars

In New Zealand, where more than 80% of electricity is renewable, the carbon footprint of electric cars is 62% lower than that of fossil cars. But their lithium battery has other environmental impacts.
Even people who accept the science of climate change sometimes resist it because it clashes with their personal projects. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: why some people still think climate change isn’t real

People are more likely to deny climate change if they're inclined toward hierarchy, have lower levels of education or are more religious. But the strongest predictor of denial is a person's politics.
Eating less meat is one change many of us can make to reduce our contribution to climate change. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: what each of us can do to reduce our carbon footprint

Individual actions to reduce emissions are important in two ways. First, they have an immediate impact, and secondly, adopting low-carbon life choices sends a clear message to political leaders.
Research into low-carbon planes is underway, but we won’t see electric long-haul flights any time soon. DENIS BALIBOUSE / POOL

Climate explained: why don’t we have electric aircraft?

Unlike a car, you can't just stick a battery-powered engine in a plane and expect it to fly. Despite that, small planes might be the future of electric flight.
Since the industrial revolution began in the mid-1700s, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have gone up by 46%. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: why we won’t be heading into an ice age any time soon

For the past two and a half million years, Earth has experienced regular ice ages, but with carbon dioxide levels now over 400 parts per million, the next ice age is postponed for a very long time.
While hemp does not sequester as much carbon dioxide as trees, it can be used as an efficient energy crop or in concrete, both with a potentially positive carbon sequestration effect. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: how different crops or trees help strip carbon dioxide from the air

Planting any tree is more important than planting a particular tree when it comes to removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
Putting a price on greenhouse gas emissions forces us to face at least some of the environmental cost of what we produce and consume. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: how emissions trading schemes work and they can help us shift to a zero carbon future

Traditional market transactions ignore the costs of greenhouse gas emissions. An emissions trading scheme is a tool to put a price on emissions and to influence us to choose lower-emission options.

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