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Articles on Hospice

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Improving death-friendliness offers further opportunity to improve social inclusion. A death-friendly approach could lay the groundwork for people to stop fearing getting old or alienating those who have. (Shutterstock)

Death-friendly communities ease fear of aging and dying

Death-friendly communities that welcome mortality might help us live better lives and provide better care for people at the end of their lives.
More older Americans are opting to die at home, often with the emotional support of a home care worker. Alexander Raths/shutterstock.com

‘Unskilled’ immigrants help to ease the pain of dying Americans

More than one-quarter of home care workers are born outside of the U.S. Stricter immigration laws could make it harder to find people to do this aide work.
Older woman in hospital with man by her side. Via Shutterstock. From www.shutterstock.comr

Can a dying patient be a healthy person?

Just because a person is dying does not mean that he or she is in a state of panic. Here’s an example of how one woman, through a well-lived life, remained at peace as she faced death.

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