Articles on ISIS

Displaying 1 - 20 of 170 articles

Three British teenagers, including Shamima Begum, center, left the U.K. to join the Islamic State in 2015. Begum wants to return home now. AP/Metropolitan Police

Is it more dangerous to let Islamic State foreign fighters from the West return or prevent them from coming back?

Many of the men and women who left homes in the West to join ISIS or similar terrorist organizations in Syria and Iraq as fighters or supporters now want to come home. Should they be allowed back?
Family members of Sunni men and boys in Iraq accused of supporting ISIS hold up pictures of their arrested relatives. AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo

Iraq’s brutal crackdown on suspected Islamic State supporters could trigger civil war

Iraq beat the Islamic State. Now, its Shia government is jailing and even executing all suspected terrorists – most of them Sunni Muslims. The clampdown may inflame a centuries-old sectarian divide.
Garbage piled up in the opposition-held city of Afrin, Syria, in March 2018. AP/Lefteris Pitarakis

Garbage collection in Syria is crucial to fighting the Islamic State

Keeping the water and power on, managing sewers and collecting garbage will help communities shattered by the Syrian civil war rebuild – and keep out the Islamic State, says a former aid official.
In this December 2009 file photo, a member of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, trains on a weapon at their camp in the Qandil mountains near the Turkish border with northern Iraq. (AP Photo/Yahya Ahmed)

The elusive quest for peace between the Turks and the Kurds

Why did negotiations between the Turkish state and the Kurds, aimed at mitigating ethnic conflict and bringing about peace, fail in Turkey?
A person lights a candle to remember the victims of the Madrid train bombings in 2004. About 200 people were killed and over 1,800 were injured in a series of commuter train bombings in the Spanish capital March 11, 2004. (AP Photo/Denis Doyle)

The group dynamics that make terrorist teams work

There is a common misconception in the West that leaders of al-Qaida and ISIS are recruiting and brainwashing people into giving up their lives for the Jihad. This is an incorrect model.
A view of ruins in Marawi city, Lanao del Sur province, Philippines, on May 23 2018. Exactly a year earlier, IS terrorists belonging to the Maute and the Abu Sayyaf groups occupied Marawi, triggering a five-month armed conflict that resulted in over a thousand deaths and left the city in ruins. Linus Escandor II/EPA

Using religion and culture to fight terrorism: lessons from the Philippine military

Indonesia can also apply strategies implemented by the Philippine government to counteract terrorism and radicalism.
Nadia Murad, co-recipient of the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize, listens to a question at a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Why Canada must prosecute returning ISIS fighters

If Canada truly stands for multiculturalism, pluralism, the rule of law, global justice, human rights and the liberal international order, we must prosecute our citizens who have fought with ISIS.
Yazidi children hold pictures of Nadia Murad, one of two winners of the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize, in Duhok, Iraq, Oct. 5, 2018. REUTERS/Ari Jalal

Warriors against sexual violence win Nobel Peace Prize: 4 essential reads

With the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize awarded to two leaders who fight against sexual violence as a tool of war, we looked into our archive to find stories about those efforts across the globe.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg takes his seat to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington in April 2018 about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Big Tech is overselling AI as the solution to online extremism

Many tech titans say they can self-regulate online hate speech and extremism with artificial intelligence, but can they?
The World Trade Center burns after being hit by planes in New York Sept. 11, 2001. Reuters/Sara K. Schwittek

Why al-Qaida is still strong 17 years after 9/11

An unprecedented onslaught from the US hasn't destroyed the terrorist organization. What is the secret of its resilience?
Iraqis carry the picture of three men who were kidnapped and executed by Islamic State during a funeral procession in Karbala, southern Iraq, in June 2018. EPA-EFE/FURQAN AL-AARAJI

Islamic State has survived 100,000 bombs and missiles and is still active

The wars against Islamic State and al-Qaida show that military responses may seem to work in the short term but don’t change much in the long run.
Anti-terror police guard the house of the family that detonated bombs in Surabaya, Indonesia, May 15 2018. Fully Handoko/EPA

How people become suicide bombers: the six steps to terrorism

To prevent people from climbing the staircase to terrorism, educating people about the values of tolerance should start early.

Top contributors

More