Articles on Julian Assange

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Barrister Jennifer Robinson, one of the lawyers on Julian Assange’s legal team, and WikiLeaks’ editor-in-chief Kristinn Hrafnsson speak to reporters outside Southwark Crown Court in London on May 1. Facundo Arrizabalaga/AAP

Julian Assange has refused to surrender himself for extradition to the US. What now?

Extradition is a heavily regulated and multi-stage process. For now, it's impossible to say what awaits Assange.
Julian Assange goes back to court in London on May 2. Reuters/Hannah Mckay

Is the Assange indictment a threat to the First Amendment?

The US indicted WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange for conspiring to hack into a government computer. But the prosecution of Assange may also pose a risk to the rights of journalists in the US.
Kristinn Hrafnsson, editor in chief of WikiLeaks, and barrister Jennifer Robinson talk to the media after Julian Assange’s arrest in London. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

Journalism’s Assange problem

It's dangerous for the press to take up Julian Assange's cause, two journalism scholars write. Assange is no journalist, they say, and making him out to be one is likely to damage press freedoms.
Julian Assange in October this year, celebrating 10 years of Wikileaks from the Ecuadorian embassy in London. AAP/Maurizio Gambarini

Hillary Clinton, Julian Assange and the US election

Martin McKenzie-Murray's recent take-down of Julian Assange and Wikileaks misses the mark in many ways.
Julian Assange sought asylum and has remained in the Ecuadorian embassy in London since 2012. Reuters/Toby Melville

UN decision is not ‘the end of the road’ that Assange claims it is

A UN panel has called on the UK and Swedish governments to ensure Julian Assange’s human rights are respected and to compensate him for his time in 'arbitrary' detention.
Speaking to you from an undisclosed location. Chris Goldberg via Flickr

We need to fix the way we talk about national intelligence

In the last few years, the list of sensitive government information made public as a result of unauthorised disclosures has increased exponentially. But who really benefits from these leaks? While they…
Whatever else motivates Julian Assange’s Wikileaks to use online media to break a court suppression order, it isn’t a respect for justice. AAP/Joe Castro

Not mad, bad or unusual: WikiLeaks and suppression orders

Contrary to twittering by the digerati, the Victorian Supreme Court suppression order revealed by WikiLeaks this week isn’t unprecedented. It isn’t futile, dangerous or an egregious restriction on a supposedly…

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