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Articles on Law

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Iranian man Mohammad Mahdi Karami at a court hearing on January 5, 2023. Karami was executed on January 7 for allegedly being involved in anti-government protests. Iranian state TV/EPA/AAP

Iran executions: the role of the ‘revolutionary courts’ in breaching human rights

Criminal trials in these courts often occur behind closed doors presided over by clerics, and there’s often no evidence beyond a confession extracted by means of torture.
AP/Victoria Jones

You can say you wish King Charles would die, but you can’t urinate on your back tyre: 8 common myths about Australian law

We’ve all been at a work or family gathering when someone has offered a seemingly authoritative statement about the way the law operates. Without some knowledge of the field of law, listeners may simply…
Parti Québécois leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon at a press conference on Oct. 17, 2022, at the Québec City National Assembly. He repeated that he did not want to swear an oath to King Charles. The Canadian Press/Karoline Boucher

There’s no official French version of the 1867 Constitution Act. So is taking the oath to the King in French valid?

No official French version of the Constitution Act of 1867 exists in 2022. This aberration calls into question the validity of taking an oath to the King in French.
Minister of Justice David Lametti participates in an Ottawa news conference in June 2022 on proposed amendments to the Criminal Code in response to a Supreme Court of Canada decision involving a defence of extreme intoxication. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

What Parliament refused to hear about Canada’s new extreme intoxication law

More than a dozen women’s organizations pleaded with the federal government to slow down and treat their concerns seriously about Bill C-28. It didn’t listen.
The full text of a law may not be in this book – nor in its online equivalent. RunPhoto/The Image Bank via Getty Images

Key parts of US laws are hard for the public to find and read

It’s a long-standing principle that people should be able to read the laws that govern them. But many technical rules and standards are hard to find and access, even for lawyers or court officials.
A migrant from Haiti waits with others at a clinic for migrants in Tijuana, Mexico. AP Photo/Gregory Bull

Supreme Court’s ‘Remain in Mexico’ ruling puts immigration policy in the hands of voters – as long as elected presidents follow the rules

In the last decision of the term, the Supreme Court cleared a barrier for the Biden administration to end a Trump-era policy returning asylum seekers arriving in the US to camps in Mexico.

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