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Articles on Justice

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A group of protesters demanding better governance in Nigeria just as the country marked its 60th Independence Day anniversary on October 1, 2020. Photo by Olukayode Jaiyeola/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Nigeria is not a failed state, but it has not delivered democracy for its people

Although it's failed to deliver democracy to citizens, Nigeria is not the collapsed and disintegrated entity which a 2005 US National Intelligence Council analysis predicted it would become by 2020.
Are cats really to blame for the worldwide loss of biodiversity? Dzurag/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Don’t blame cats for destroying wildlife – shaky logic is leading to moral panic

Framing cats as responsible for declines in biodiversity is based on faulty scientific logic and fails to account for the real culprit – human activity.
Canada doesn’t extradite people to countries with the death penalty. But there are other ways to put those accused of crimes at serious risk. (Erika Wittlieb/Pixabay)

Is Canada helping other countries kill people?

Canadians should know more about how our government co-operates with other countries in criminal cases. Are we unwittingly risking the lives or rights of those accused of crimes?
Armed white citizens and police have historically worked together in the U.S., though it’s not clear whether that’s what’s happening here. George Frey/Getty Images

Vigilantism, again in the news, is an American tradition

For many Americans, law and order has long been as much a private matter as something for the government to handle.
The coronavirus crisis isn’t hitting all communities equally hard, calling for not just aid like this California food bank but also justice-oriented policies to redress harms. Mario Tama/Getty Images

3 moral virtues necessary for an ethical pandemic response and reopening

Confronting the massive social problems caused by the coronavirus requires policies built on compassion, solidarity and justice – core values of virtuous societies worldwide.
A red marks the face of Felicien Kabuga, one of the last key suspects in the 1994 Rwandan genocide, on a wanted poster at the Genocide Fugitive Tracking Unit office in Kigali, Rwanda. Photo by SIMON WOHLFAHRT/AFP via Getty Images

Rwandans will want Félicien Kabuga tried at home. Why this won’t happen

Though genocide survivors would ideally want Kabuga to be prosecuted in Rwanda, it won't be possible, for legal or political reasons.
‘Death of Captain Cook’ by George Carter. 1781. Oil on canvas. The painting depicts the killing of Cook during a skirmish with Hawaiians on his third Pacific voyage in 1779. National Library of Australia collection

Captain Cook wanted to introduce British justice to Indigenous people. Instead, he became increasingly cruel and violent

Over the course of his three voyages, Cook was frustrated by the refusal of Indigenous people to embrace Western ways. He grew increasingly punitive, embodying the 'savagery' he ostensibly despised.

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