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Most countries closed their borders, at least partially, at some point last year. But the world is starting to reopen. COVID Border Accountability Project

Closed borders, travel bans and halted immigration: 5 ways COVID-19 changed how – and where – people move around the world

Last year, 189 countries – home to roughly 65% of the global population – cut themselves off from the world at some point. Borders are now reopening and travel resuming, but normal is a ways off.
Gene-based vaccines had never been approved for humans before the coronavirus pandemic. Juan Gaertner/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

3 medical innovations fueled by COVID-19 that will outlast the pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic has driven a lot of scientific progress in the past year. But just as some of the social changes are likely here to stay, so are some medical innovations.
Nurse Nicole Chang celebrates after receiving one of the first injections of the COVID-19 vaccine Dec. 16 at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Westwood, California. Brian van der Brug/Getty Images

Vaccinated and ready to party? Not so fast, says the CDC, but you can gather with other vaccinated people

Millions of vaccinated people have been waiting for guidelines on what they can do safely. The CDC says it's OK to gather with other vaccinated people, but it's still best to avoid travel.
Stacked disasters – like a winter storm that damages a water system during a pandemic – can provide lessons for the next time around. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

5 strategies to prepare now for the next pandemic

Shoring up surveillance and response systems and learning lessons from how the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded will help the world be ready the next time around.
A sign in County Kildare, Ireland. in March 2020. Epidemiologists around the world worked hard to try to stop big parties in the face of rising caseloads of what would come to be called COVID-19. Niall Carson/PA Images via Getty Images

Two gaps to fill for the 2021-2022 winter wave of COVID-19 cases

The US was not ready for the coronavirus pandemic in 2020. What can public health leaders and policymakers do to make sure we don't face another winter of rampant disease?
An unidentified doctor talks with a boy who holds a lollipop reward after participating in a measles vaccine research program in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, in 1963. NASA/PhotoQuest/Getty Images

What’s in a name for a vaccine campaign? Maybe the end of the pandemic

Vaccination has been controversial from its beginning. Gaining people's trust in vaccines has been crucial. An important part of that is a strong communications plan.

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