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Articles on Right-wing extremism

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Some 25,000 National Guard troops protected Joe Biden’s presidential inauguration due to fears of a far-right extremist attack. Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

US could face a simmering, chronic domestic terror problem, warn security experts

Far-right extremists in the US have the potential to mount a coordinated, low-intensity campaign of political violence. It wouldn't be the country's first experience with domestic terror.
Twitter’s suspension of Donald Trump’s account took away his preferred means of communicating with millions of his followers. AP Photo/Tali Arbel

Does ‘deplatforming’ work to curb hate speech and calls for violence? 3 experts in online communications weigh in

Banning extremists from social media platforms can reduce hate speech, but the deplatforming process has to be handled with care – and it can have unintended consequences.
Parler is similar to Twitter but doesn’t control or discourage hate speech or calls to violence. OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Image

Big Tech’s rejection of Parler shuts down a site favored by Trump supporters – and used by participants in the US Capitol insurrection

Millions of supporters of Donald Trump flocked to the far-right social media platform, where hate speech and calls for violence thrive. The US Capitol insurrection could be the platform's undoing.
In this April 2020 photo, protesters carry rifles near the steps of the Michigan State Capitol building in Lansing, Mich. A plot to kidnap Michigan’s governor has put a focus on the security of governors in the United States. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Right-wing extremism: The new wave of global terrorism

Is right-wing violent extremism the new fifth wave of modern terrorism? If so, there's no doubt the impacts of COVID-19 will only help accelerate the radicalization of its adherents.
A member of the far-right Boogaloo Bois group walks next to protestors in Charlotte, N.C., on May 29, 2020. Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images

Why are white supremacists protesting the deaths of black people?

They're not really protesting – they're hoping to find an opportunity to spark violence and trigger a war between black and white Americans.
Donald Trump is no Richard Nixon. And that’s why he’ll never willingly leave office in 2020. (The Associated Press)

Trump will cling to power — and Republicans will cling to him

Trump will survive the impeachment process in 2020, no matter what malfeasance comes to light. The Republicans will protect their man at all costs.
Protesters assembled at a Reclaim Australia rally in Sydney in 2017. Paul Miller/AAP

Right-wing extremism has a long history in Australia

Groups promoting right wing extremism, like the Antipodean Resistance and the Lads Society, have recently dominated headlines, but they are far from the sum of the extreme right in Australia.
White supremacist groups like the National Socialist Movement, seen here at a rally in Arkansas on Nov. 10, 2018, have gained power in the U.S. since 2016. Reuters/Jim Urquhart

White nationalism, born in the USA, is now a global terror threat

The recent massacre at a New Zealand mosque is a traceable, direct outgrowth of an American white nationalist movement that insists immigrants and people of color are a threat to 'white civilization.'
Bolsonaro supporters celebrate outside his home in Rio de Janeiro after exit polls on Oct. 28 declared him the preliminary winner of Brazil’s 2018 presidential election. AP Photo/Leo Correa

Bolsonaro wins Brazil election, promises to purge leftists from country

Jair Bolsonaro, a right-wing congressman and former army captain, is Brazil's next president, with 56 percent of votes. Critics see a threat to democracy in his scathing attacks on Brazilian society.
A man breaks down next to the caskets of three of the six victims of the Quebec City mosque shooting during funeral services in February 2017 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Trump may have emboldened hate in Canada, but it was already here

As Canadians, we shouldn't blame U.S. President Donald Trump for the rise of hatred here. He may have emboldened the so-called alt-right in Canada, but it was flourishing long before his election.
Counter-demonstrators hold up a sign reading “Today’s police protecting tomorrow’s Hitler” when protesting against an election meeting arranged by the Swedish neo-Nazi party Svenskarnas Parti in Stockholm, August 2014. EPA/Fredrik Persson

Scandinavia: the radical right meets the mainstream

It's not just the US which is seeing a rise in support for neo-Nazi organisations and right-wing politics. In Scandinavia it's infiltrating the mainstream.

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