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Colten Boushie’s family fought for accountability after the racist actions of the RCMP as they investigated the death of her son who was shot and killed by a local farmer. Here she holds up his photo during the 2018 trial. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Richards

Watchdog report into RCMP investigation of Colten Boushie’s death confirms police racism

Years of research show that Indigenous, Black and racialized people experience over-policing but also, under-policing, as was the case with the RCMP investigation into Colten Boushie's death in 2016.
An RCMP officer looks on as supporters of the Wet'suwet'en Nation block a road outside of RCMP headquarters in Surrey, B.C., in January 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Provincial governments are setting the stage for more violence against Indigenous Peoples and their lands

The passage of laws in Alberta and Saskatchewan granting police greater powers and weapons are seen as a direct attempt to stifle protests by Indigenous Peoples.
Although the United Nations has raised concerns about the rights of children, advocates say a baby hatch, like the one shown here in Karlsruhe, Germany, can save lives. (Hardt Foundation)

After a newborn was found in a recycling bin, a safe haven baby hatch may save lives

Since an infant was found in a recycling bin last fall in Saskatoon, advocates have renewed their campaign for baby hatches, places mothers can leave newborns safely and anonymously.
Senator Yvonne Boyer, a Metis lawyer and former nurse called tubal ligations carried out on unwilling Indigenous women one of the “most heinous” practices in health care happening across Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Forced sterilizations of Indigenous women: One more act of genocide

It may not be legally called genocide, but the impact of the Canadian government's actions, including the sterilization of Indigenous women, still add up to genocidal practices.
Indigenous women’s activism in Canada has a long history. The organizing work of Isabelle McNab, first president of the Saskatchewan Women’s Indian Association, can be seen as the precursor to later activism like this First Nations Idle No More protest for better treatment of Indigenous peoples at the Douglas-Peace Arch near Surrey, B.C., on Jan. 5, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Hidden from history: Indigenous women’s activism in Saskatchewan

Built on historical research, this article tells the resilient, fascinating and rarely told history of Indigenous women's organizing and resistance in Saskatchewan.

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