Articles on Antibiotic resistance

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There already exist some promising new antibiotic therapies, and more are in the pipeline. However, our economic model prevents researchers from moving them out onto the market. (Shutterstock)

Humanity under threat from antibiotic-resistant infections

The end of effective antibiotics will be frightening. Life expectancy will fall dramatically and people of all ages will die from illnesses that we are used to treating with $10 worth of pills.
An artist depiction of a biofilm harboring antibiotic-resistant rod-shaped and spherical bacteria. Kateryna Kon/Shutterstock.com

How scientists are fighting infection-causing biofilms

Smooth surfaces often provide nooks and crannies for bacteria to hold onto and create a colony. New research with nanoparticles is revealing the secrets of surfaces that prevent bacterial attachment.
Clostridium difficile bacteria causes diarrhea and inflammation of the colon. By Kateryna Kon/shutterstock.com

A novel ‘smart’ antibiotic may target most common bacterial infection contracted in US hospitals

A new type of antibiotic uses DNA to fight a common deadly microbe, Clostridium difficile. These new drugs are inexpensive and adaptable and can be modified to target any bacterium, lowering the chance of drug resistance.
Cattle that are grass-fed, antibiotic- and growth hormone-free gather at a farm in Oregon in 2015. There’s a debate over whether antibiotic use in livestock makes germs more resistant to the drugs, and results in infections being passed on to humans who consume the meat. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

Why reducing antibiotics in farm animals isn’t as easy as it seems

The use of antibiotics in raising livestock is complex. We could be moving towards a less-than-ideal result due to poor understanding, over-simplistic messaging and a rush for competitive advantage.
Bacteria in the dish on the left are sensitive to antibiotics in the paper discs. The ones on the right are resistant to four of the seven antibiotics. Dr. Graham Beards

Bacteria may be powerful weapon against antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic-munching microbes may prove useful for mopping up contaminated water supplies and land.
Research shows potential for delivering our drugs in ways that would make it harder for antibiotic resistance to evolve and spread. Here we see a close up view of a biofilm of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (Shutterstock)

‘Drug sanctuaries’ offer hope for a post-antibiotic world

As a post-antibiotic future beckons, how can humanity protect itself against the proliferation of superbugs? Research suggests 'drug sanctuaries' in hospitals could be a promising solution.
New Zealand researchers have found that the active ingredients in commonly-used weed killers like Round-up and Kamba can cause bacteria to become less susceptible to antibiotics. from www.shutterstock.com

New research suggests common herbicides are linked to antibiotic resistance

Improper use of antibiotics is one reason for the rise in antibiotic resistance, but new research shows that ingredients in common weed killers can also cause bacteria to become less susceptible.

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