Articles on Basketball

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Players from all over the world, including Australia’s star forward Thon Maker - originally from South Sudan - play in the National Basketball Association in the United States. Tannen Maury/EPA

How a race scare left South Sudanese star basketballers with nowhere to play

Star basketball players are suffering the fallout from a race scare campaign by politicians from the Liberal party over crimes committed by a small number of young people who came to Australia from South Sudan
Through the 2018 WNBA All-Star game on July 28, viewership was up 38 percent compared to the same point last year. AP Photo/Stacy Bengs

The case for boosting WNBA player salaries

Like the WNBA, the NBA went through fits and starts in its early years. Yet despite drawing similar crowds in the 1960s, NBA players earned far bigger paychecks than today's WNBA stars receive.
Houston Rockets head coach Mike D'Antoni, during Game 2 of the NBA basketball Western Conference finals against the Golden State Warriors in Houston. D'Antoni successfully resisted calls to change his team’s offensive strategy after losing Game 1. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Management wisdom from the NBA: sometimes the best move is the one you don’t make

Research has shown that the most successful basketball coaches resist pressure to make changes during games. Choosing not to make a move is sometimes also the right call for business leaders.
The former president, seen here with the highest paid basketball coach in the NCAA, was known for getting into March Madness. AP Photo/Alex Brandon

What is March Madness – and the nonprofit that manages the mayhem?

Every March, millions of Americans watch the NCAA's annual college basketball tournament, while millions more fill in brackets to win their office pool.
North Carolina head coach Roy Williams looks on during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game agaist Notre Dame. AP Photo/Robert Franklin

In scandal after scandal, NCAA takes fall for complicit colleges

If we think about universities as corporations and their sports teams as marketing tools, everything about the UNC academic scandal – and the nonresponse – makes perfect sense.
Who will emerge as this year’s David Freese? Eric Gay/AP Photo

The psychology of the clutch athlete

What makes someone more likely to succeed when the lights shine brightest?
While this football player’s arms may look like they give him an onfield advantage, his fingers may actually be more predictive of his athletic ability. Ostill/Shutterstock.com

Finger size does matter… in sports

Athletic ability is often linked to size – of muscles and bones. New studies are suggesting, however, that the relative size of two fingers could be more predictive of ability.

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