Articles on Cancer treatment

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Scientists have been looking for and finding ways to track various cancers in the blood for some time. from

Can we use a simple blood test to detect cancer?

By measuring a cancer cell's DNA in the bloodstream, scientists can get a snapshot of the cancer itself, which is referred as a "liquid biopsy".
Though commonly associated with food poisoning, the strain of salmonella used is a benign variety. Shutterstock/Tatiana Shepeleva

Could friendly bacteria be used to treat cancer?

What started with a study of diseases transmitted by mosquitos, could end with a new way of treating cancer.
Glioblastomas are often resistant to the one type of drug that breaks the blood-brain barrier. HealthHub

Glioblastoma: why these brain cancers are so difficult to treat

Glioblastoma is an aggressive form of brain cancer that has a very poor prognosis. Despite the current best therapies half its sufferers survive for 15 months and less than 5% are alive after 5 years.
Do parents know enough about clinical trials to give informed consent? Sick child image via

Clinical trials for childhood cancer drugs are critical, but parents don’t always understand what they are signing up for

The dramatic improvements in survival for children with cancer depend on clinical trials, and these trials depend on parents understanding the possible risks and benefits involved.
Barack Obama’s goal for America to find a ‘cure’ for cancer is unrealistic and too simplistic. EPA/Evan Vucci

Resolving to ‘cure cancer’, Obama promises the impossible

Obama's goal of "curing" cancer is unrealistic, simplistic and not achievable. Cancer is a group of more than 100 different diseases for which no single cure will ever be effective.
Checkpoint blockade and adoptive immunotherapy are two examples of the fourth and newest pillar of cancer therapy. from

The fourth pillar: how we’re arming the immune system to help fight cancer

New treatment options for cancer have flowed from our knowledge of how cells work, including the realisation the patient’s own immune system is a powerful agent in defeating cancer.
Understanding the DNA of tumours allows researchers to target treatment to each individual. Erika/Flickr

How cancer doctors use personalised medicine to target variations unique to each tumour

Personalised medicine is based on the idea that by understanding the specific molecular code of a person’s disease, and particularly its genetic makeup, we can more accurately tailor treatment.
Keytruda® targets a protein on the surface of immune cells that stopped them from attacking the melanoma cells. Australis Photography/Shutterstock

Explainer: how does Keytruda treat melanoma and why is it so costly?

Keytruda® is the latest drug to be registered in Australia for the treatment of widespread melanoma. But we must wait to see if it meets the cost-effectiveness targets for PBS subsidisation.

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