Articles on Domestic violence

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Women and children are 14 times more likely than men to die in a disaster. AAP Image/Darren Pateman

Domestic violence will spike in the bushfire aftermath, and governments can no longer ignore it

Natural disasters amplify the conditions leading to domestic violence. Yet Australia's disaster policies are "gender blind".
Intimate violence victims fare better with coordinated help. Shutterstock, photo illustration by Dragana Gordic

Don’t make intimate violence victims look for help – research shows they fare better when police and community organizations coordinate assistance

Women and children remain vulnerable to harm even after intimate violence has occurred. Coordinating a community's response can help avoid educational, employment, social, housing and legal problems.
Morocco reformed its family law in 2004 to increase the legal age of marriage to 18. Shutterstock

Child marriage in North Africa: still a lot to be done

The region has made progress but efforts must continue to end a harmful practice rooted in poverty and tradition.
This child and her mother found refuge at a women’s shelter, but many are unable to find the secure housing they need to escape family violence. Dan Peled/AAP

Another stolen generation looms unless Indigenous women fleeing violence can find safe housing

Indigenous children are admitted to out-of-home care at 11 times the rate for non-Indigenous children. The lack of safe housing for mothers fleeing family violence is a key factor.
Pauline Hanson incorrectly claimed women are frequently making up allegations of domestic violence in family courts. AAP Image/Sam Mooy

We don’t need another inquiry into family law – we need action

It seems the driving force behind this new inquiry is Pauline Hanson's unsupported claim women often make up allegations of domestic violence in family courts.
Violence against women is often represented as a timeless and universal phenomenon, creating the view the problem is too large to fix, or that only the worst abuses are worthy of attention. James Ross/AAP Image

The long history of gender violence in Australia, and why it matters today

History shows that domestic violence has been deeply entrenched in the culture of Australia from its early days. Progress is only made by understanding this history – and talking about it.
In February, thousands of women marched in Mexico City to demand that President Andrés Manuel López Obrador do more to keep women safe. The protest sign featured here reads, ‘Don’t be indifferent.’ Reuters/Edgard Garrido/Reuters

Mexican president López Obrador has a woman problem

Mexico is the second most dangerous country for women in Latin America. Yet the new government is slashing funding for programs meant to protect and empower women.
A new book by ABC journalist Jess Hill is the result of four years’ investigation into the problem of domestic violence. Shutterstock

See What You Made Me Do: why it’s time to focus on the perpetrator when tackling domestic violence

A new book scrutinises the social and psychological causes of domestic abuse, its terrifying consequences, particularly the impact on children, and the failure of our legal and social institutions to adequately respond.
People between the ages of 25 and 34 are the largest group of woman who find themselves homeless. Oleg Golovnev/Shutterstock

‘I didn’t want to be homeless with a baby’: young women share their stories of homelessness

The largest group of homeless women is between the ages of 25 and 34, and family violence is most often the cause. Their stories testify to the dangers and stresses of not having a place to call home.

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