Articles on Innovation Statement

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When Malcolm Turnbull became prime minister, the innovation debate began in earnest, but some of Australia’s rivals have a head start in the fierce global contest of ideas. AAP/Dan Himbrechts

Battle of ideas is on as election-year innovation debate starts to make up for lost time

Politicians and policymakers are at last grappling with the urgent need to generate new ideas and fresh ways of doing things. But in the race to the top, Australia has barely reached base camp.
2015 saw us complete our exploration of all nine planets (including dwarf planet Pluto) in our solar system. NASA

2015, the year that was: Science + Technology

2015 was a year where we expanded our view of the universe, embraced new technologies and got a hint of the profound changes to come.
Managing the risks of industry-researcher collaboration: Coca-Cola got caught for funding scientists who shifted blame for obesity away from bad diets. from

Australia’s innovation agenda: embracing risk or gambling with public health?

The innovation report fails to mention the risk of bias for researchers collaborating with industry. We must ensure that researchers maintain their independence.
Malcolm Turnbull has now announced his strategy to promote innovation and science in Australia. AAP/Lukas Coch

Expert panel: what the national innovation statement means for science

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull today announced the National Innovation and Science Agenda (NISA). Here's what it means for science, commercialisation and industry in Australia.
Innovation Minister Christopher Pyne and Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull launched the innovation statement at the CSIRO. Mick Tsikas/AAP

‘Ideas boom’ to drive the Australian economy: Turnbull

Malcolm Turnbull is looking to an "ideas boom" to be the new source for Australia's growth, prosperity and jobs now the mining boom has faded.
Of course, science, technology, engineering and mathematics research are important, but social sciences research creates huge benefits to society in multiple ways. Leo Grübler/Flickr

Focus on STEM risks sidelining social science innovation

Research in the humanities, arts and social sciences is often driven by philosophies of social justice and public benefit, which don't always sit comfortably with commercialisation.

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