Articles on Language

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Edward Hopper’s ‘Office in a Small City’ (1953). Gandalf's Gallery

A history of loneliness

Although loneliness may seem timeless and universal, the word seems to have originated in the 16th century,
The language that you speak may affect your approach to climate change. from

Future tense: how the language you speak influences your willingness to take climate action

Research suggests that speakers of "present-tensed" languages such as German and Finnish - in which the future can be describe in the present tense - are more likely to support stronger climate policies.
The fight over gendered language may seem frivolous but speaking a heavily gendered language may highlight gender distinctions and lead to discrimination.

Using ‘she’ and ‘he’ reinforces gender roles and discrimination of women

We could expect a change in language to decrease gender disparities across a host of measures, including wages, educational attainment, and leadership positions in corporate and political life.
The use of the term pelakor in isolation reveals people’s tendency to blame only the woman in an affair, though it obviously takes two to tango.

In Indonesia, a sexist term for ‘the other woman’

Recently, many Indonesians have been bombarded with stories about the “pelakor”, a term popularly used to refer to a woman who is perceived as responsible for ruining a couple’s marriage).
Aussie slang such as ‘budgie’, ‘greenie’, ‘pollie’, ‘surfie’, and even ‘mozzie’ are now also making appearances in global English. shutterstock

Get yer hand off it, mate, Australian slang is not dying

Every few years there’s a furphy that our beloved 'Strine' slang is doing a Harold Holt – but in fact Aussies are still slinging true-blue slang.
A day after Donald Trump met with Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg, he told lawmakers the U.S. should have more immigrants from places like Norway and not “shithole” countries like Haiti. AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

‘Shithole countries’: Trump uses the rhetoric of dictators

Donald Trump's language has disturbing similarities to the words and verbal tactics used by fascists, including his cries of "fake news" and his obsessive exaggerations about his achievements.

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