Articles on Richard Nixon

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It’s common for presidential candidates to announce their campaigns 18 months or more in advance of election day. Reuters/Carlos Barria

Everything you wanted to know about US elections but were afraid to ask

Global audiences have heard of US election terms like the primaries, the conventions and the Electoral College. But the history and exact meaning of these terms remains a mystery to many.
A Halloween gathering in Los Angeles for children who live on the street, in shelters or in cars. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

How racism has shaped welfare policy in America since 1935

On the 20th anniversary of Bill Clinton's promise to "end welfare as we know it," a social work scholar asks why child poverty is still such a problem in the U.S. and what race has to do with it.
Richard Nixon, 1971. Oliver F. Atkins/US National Archives and Records Administration

How Snapchat is scooping ‘The Boys on the Bus’

With three in four American voters using a smartphone, mobile devices are revolutionizing how political news is consumed – and reported.
Ninian Reed flickr

The political work of the Confederate flag

Public opinion on the flag may have shifted with lightning speed, but how did it hold on as long as it did? The answer has to do with how it served both Democratic and Republican parties alike.
Presidents Obama and Castro instigated rumors of a thaw when they shook hands for the first time at the memorial for Nelson Mandela in December last year. Kai Pfaffenbach/Reuters

History lessons from China for future relations with Cuba

This past December, Presidents Barack Obama and Raoúl Castro ended over fifty years of economic and political isolation between the US and Cuba with their shock announcement that they intend to re-establish…
The new normal? image via

Dark money: five years after Citizens United

This week’s news brings an important “ah hah” moment. The conservative billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch of Koch Industries and their political network of donors and opaque outside groups are…
Congressman Henry Waxman: relieved to be going after 40 years? Gary Cameron/Reuters

Fond farewell to the ‘babies’ of Watergate

An era has ended. The last of the “Watergate Babies” has left the Congress. The nickname was applied to the class of House Democratic freshmen elected in 1974 in the wake of the Watergate scandal. There…
Gas guzzled: OPEC’s 1973 oil embargo threw America into crisis and underlined the political power of energy. David Falconer/Wikimedia Commons

Four decades later, has America finally got over the oil crisis?

The Australian Financial Review recently trumpeted America’s “re-emergence as a world oil power”. It is an accomplishment four decades in the making and its success is still under debate. Energy security…
Scourge of the elite. Miguel Ariel Contreras Drake-McLaughlin

Bradlee was a bold editor who helped us understand the world

Ben Bradlee, the former editor of the Washington Post, who has died at the age of 93 was a crusading and courageous editor. He played a central role in exposing duplicity and deception at the highest levels…
The Obamas have adopted a second dog, Sunny, to go with Bo. What do the pets presidents have say about them? The White House

Politics on four legs: presidents and their pets

A dog saved Richard Nixon’s political career. In September 1952, Republican presidential nominee Dwight Eisenhower was furious with Nixon, his running mate in the coming presidential election. Nixon, who…

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