Articles on Whistleblowers

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Scientists felt strength in numbers at April’s March for Science. But those who speak out individually may suffer career repercussions. David Moir/AAP

What happens when scientists stand up for science

It's not a new phenomenon that scientists who challenge the orthodoxy or policy positions suffer career ramifications.
When scientists stand up, do they lose standing? Liz Lemon

Should scientists engage in activism?

In the wake of the Flint water crisis and with a new notably anti-science president, U.S. scientists are reevaluating how to navigate the tension between speaking out and a fear of losing research funding.
Banking inquiries in their current form serve as political theatre, rather than as a genuine form of accountability. Lukas Coch/AAP

Banking inquiry findings – ask the wrong questions get the wrong answers

Members of House Standing Committee on Economics should be asking the directors of Australia's Big Four banks (not the CEOs) different questions, if they really want the right answers.
Involving the media seems to send the message of how unpleasant the AFP can make life for people who challenge the government. AAP/Lukas Coch

Paying a high price for embarrassing the government

None of the politicians are talking about it, but threats to freedom of speech have emerged in three different guises in the first three weeks of the election campaign. First there was the assailing of…
Senator Sam Dastyari, who has been involved in scrutinising the banks, and former Commonwealth Bank employee turned whistleblower Jeff Morris. Stefan Postles/AAP

Patchy laws leave corporate whistleblowers vulnerable

Whistleblowers need better incentives, compensation and protection under Australian law, especially those in the private and not-for-profit sectors.
For years, Talese’s subject, Gerald Foos, spied on his motel guests. 'Binoculars' via www.shutterstock.com

The murky ethics of Gay Talese’s ‘The Voyeur’s Motel’

When Gay Talese signed a confidentiality agreement with a motel-owning voyeur, he got access to the voyeur's journals and secret viewing perch. But he also allowed the spying to continue for over a decade.
Great leaders listen and observe, as well as show self and social awareness. Expression by Shutterstock

How showing your emotions at work can make you a better leader

A staggering 20% of senior management positions remain empty in the NHS – a figure that goes up to 37% in mental health. As demand for health and social care services go up in a context of recession and…

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