Articles sur Big Bang

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Part of the new map of dark matter made from gravitational lensing measurements of 26 million galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey. Chihway Chang/University of Chicago/DES collaboration

What a new map of the universe tells us about dark matter

We still can't see the dark matter thought to make up about a quarter of the universe, but at least now we have a map of its structure.
In the beginning, the Universe expanded very, very fast. Flickr/Jamie

Curious Kids: what started the Big Bang?

What caused the Big Bang is still a mystery. And that's just one of the many unanswered questions, in spite of everything we do know about the birth of the Universe.
The truth is we don’t really know if space goes on forever – but maybe, one day, we will find out. Sweetie187/flickr

Curious Kids: Does space go on forever?

People used to think that when they looked up at the night sky, they were seeing all of space. Then American astronomer Edwin Hubble found out something so amazing, NASA named a telescope after him.
A colour image of G63349, one of the galaxies in the survey, created using near-infrared (VISTA telescope) and optical (Sloan telescope) data collated by the GAMA survey. (The bright green object is a nearby star.) ICRAR/GAMA

Don’t panic, but the universe is slowly dying

Our universe's most exciting days are well behind us, with new research showing the universe is now slowly but surely dying.
The epoch of the leptons existed for nine seconds after the Big Bang. Big Bang by Shutterstock

Explainer: what are fundamental particles?

Subatomic particles have shaped and continue to shape our universe but despite perfect predictions by physicists, the theory about unseen particles is still wrong.
Some of the antennas of the Murchison Widefield Array radio telescope, designed to uncover what happened in the first billion years of the universe. Curtin University

Unlocking the mystery of the first billion years of the universe

More than 100 million years has been wiped off the age of the first stars but there is still the question of what happened in the first billion years of the universe. Earlier this month the European Space…
New data reveals no evidence of gravitational waves in the early universe, as observed by the BICEP2 radio telescope (pictured) near the South Pole. teffen Richter, Harvard University

Gravitational wave discovery still clouded by galactic dust

One of this century’s greatest potential discoveries concerning the origins of the universe has now fallen to galactic dust. That’s according to a new joint-analysis of all the existing data – including…
There’s a lot of dust between us and the edge of the universe. H Raab/Flickr

Has dust clouded the discovery of gravitational waves?

It’s almost three months since a team of scientists announced it had detected polarised light from the afterglow of the Big Bang. But questions are still being asked about whether cosmic dust may have…

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