Articles sur Bob Hawke

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The Hawke Labor government had a strong incentive to seek a new approach to industrial relations when it came to office. National Archives of Australia

Australian politics explainer: the Prices and Incomes Accord

The Prices and Incomes Accord was a series of agreements between Labor and the ACTU where unions would moderate their wage demands in exchange for improvements in the 'social wage'.
Australia must think differently about its relationship with the US under Donald Trump. Reuters/Carlos Barria

The tag is cut: how will the Trump-Turnbull spat damage the alliance?

Australian and American leaders over the years have, from time to time, disagreed or said things to cause embarrassment. But, for the most part, such disagreements have been kept out of the limelight.
Choosing Cairns or Townsville as a northern Queensland capital would set off a political storm, as would new regional governments around Australia. Dan Peled/AAP

If we scrapped the states, increasing Canberra’s clout would be a backward step

Federal politicians and the public like the idea of abolishing the states. But consider the likely result: a more powerful Canberra, with regional governments amounting to glorified shire councils.
Paul Keating took the prime ministership with a ‘comprehensive plan to get the country cracking’, but the task was daunting. National Archives of Australia

Cabinet papers 1992-93: the balance of head and heart

Labor’s project of economic transformation hit some harder realities as Paul Keating assumed the top job. And a new push on remaking Australia stirred a brooding reaction of its own.
Australian wind energy has been under a cloud for much of its decades-long history. AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Attacks on renewable energy policy are older than the climate issue itself

Skirmishes over funding for renewable energy research are just the latest battle in a saga that stretches back to the early 1980s – years before the public became widely aware of the climate threat.
The Australian government seems to think fossil fuels need help, when businesses are deciding otherwise. Coal image from www.shutterstock.com

Fossil fuel growth centre harks back to old ideas about climate costs

Do fossil fuels need saving from efforts to combat climate change? The Australian government seems to think so, but that sort of thinking is out of date.
Gareth Evans, foreign minister in the Hawke government, brought an ambitious vision for Australia’s international diplomacy to cabinet. AAP

Cabinet papers 1990-91: the new world order that fizzled

There is little of Gareth Evans’ sweeping analysis in the cabinet papers of 1990-91 of a rapidly changing world order or of his vision of good international citizenship.
Prime Minister Bob Hawke opening the General Assembly of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, Perth, November 1990. National Archives of Australia

Cabinet papers 1990-91: déjà vu? We’re having the same debate about climate as we were then

The National Archives of Australia today released selected federal cabinet records for 1990 and 1991. They reveal intense battles over Australia's domestic climate targets and, above all, a palpable determination that Australia not damage its coal revenue.
Hawke said his government passed more legislation in 1990 and 1991 than any other since federation. National Archives of Australia

Cabinet papers 1990-91: leadership scrutiny distracts from historic Hawke reforms

While the press at the time focused on what Keating called “the Punch and Judy show”, cabinet papers reveal that the fourth Hawke government was working at an astonishing pace at reforms still felt today.
Mutual admiration between big businessmen like Alan Bond (left) and the Labor Party was a double-edged sword for Bob Hawke in the 1980s. AAP/NAA

Book extract: The Eighties – The Decade That Transformed Australia

In the 1980s Australians grappled with the challenges of living in an era that brought together boom and crisis, nationalism and globalisation, confidence and anxiety, and conservatism and exuberance.

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