Articles sur Data privacy

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While leaks and whistleblowers continue to be valuable tools in the fight for data privacy, we can’t rely on them solely to keep big tech companies in check. SHUTTERSTOCK

The ugly truth: tech companies are tracking and misusing our data, and there’s little we can do

Most of us are probably having our data tracked in some form. And while there are regulatory safeguards in place to protect user privacy, it's hard to say whether these are enough.
DNA database giant Ancestry lets members access international records including the convict and free settler lists, passenger lists, Australian and New Zealand electoral rolls and military records. Patrick Alexander/Flickr

If you’ve given your DNA to a DNA database, US police may now have access to it

A US judge has allowed police access to the major DNA database without users' consent (including Australian users). It's a timely reminder that we urgently need genetic privacy legislation.
User agreements are often long, complex and inaccessible texts that don’t help users understand what exactly is being done with their information. Shutterstock

Plain language about health data is essential for transparency and trust

As more data are collected, it's important for the public to understand how their health information is being used. But user agreements are often complex, lengthy and written in inaccessible language.
Is privacy what you can’t see, or where you don’t look? Kamil Macniak/Shutterstock.com

What’s private depends on who you are and where you live

Privacy starts with the body and extends to digital data. There are few rules governing what companies can do – yet people can't effectively protect their own privacy.
Facebook looks different - but we’re still waiting for clarification on how they’re going to handle user data into the future. Julien de Rosa / AAP

Facebook is now cleaner, faster and group-focused, but still all about your data

Facebook is built on harvesting platform data about its users, crunching that to predict behaviours and allegiances and then selling this package to advertisers. That hasn't changed yet.
Biometrics like retinal scans is a new frontier in the privacy wars. Reuters/Mike Blake

Congress is considering privacy legislation – be afraid

States like California have been at the forefront of privacy innovation in recent decades. A possible federal law could bring their experimentation to a halt, harming consumers.
Smart city planning will need to address data collection and protecting the privacy of minors in public space. Shutterstock

Protecting children’s data privacy in the smart city

The history of how Alphabet Inc. and its subsidiaries manage children and data is a troubling one. How will Sidewalk Labs address concerns about minors and privacy in Toronto's Quayside project?

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