Artikel-artikel mengenai Cardiovascular disease

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Trade and investment agreements can increase consumption of unhealthy foods, sugary drinks and tobacco – leading to soaring rates of obesity and chronic diseases globally. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

The hidden connection between obesity, heart disease and trade

As government representatives meet at the WHO global conference on noncommunicable diseases in Uruguay this week, their focus should be on reducing the health impacts of trade deals.
When we sit, we accumulate calories and excess fat which can cause obesity, diabetes, cancer, heart disease and death. The solution may be as simple as counting. (Shutterstock)

How to stop sitting yourself to death

If you sit all day at work, then cancer, diabetes, heart disease and death are the likely outcomes. A cardiologist explains how the simple act of counting can reverse this evolutionary trend.
While office workers often worry they sit too long while on the job, research suggests standing at work increases the risk of heart disease. (Shutterstock)

Standing too much at work can double your risk of heart disease

Annoyed you don't have a sit-stand desk? Spare a thought for those workers who have to stand all day: Standing may double the risk of heart disease.
The benefits of healthy older people taking statins to prevent heart disease and stroke needs to be balanced with the risk of side effects. from www.shutterstock.com

How old is too old for cholesterol lowering medications?

An Australian trial will give us a clearer picture of whether healthy old people benefit from taking statins to prevent heart disease and stroke.
A controversial editorial has questioned whether saturated fats really clog up your arteries and put you at risk of heart disease. But can it really overturn decades of research? from www.shutterstock.com

Viewpoints: is saturated fat really the killer it’s made out to be?

We need to eat a healthy diet, do some exercise and avoid stress rather than blame saturated fat for heart disease, says a recent editorial. But does the evidence stack up?
Happy-looking seniors via Shutterstock. From www.shutterstock.com

Why dementia burden may be less than feared

Improvements in education and vascular health are likely partly responsible for a sharp decline in dementia over the past few decades. The trend may continue, if we also address obesity and diabetes.

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