Artikel-artikel mengenai Chronic pain

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Some people feel more pain than others. Mikhail_Kayl / Shutterstock.com

Why do some people hurt more than others?

Researchers are exploring the genetic differences that dictate why some people suffer greater pain than others, and how to translate these findings into personalized pain treatments.
More than 100 million American suffer from chronic pain – in which pain signals continue in the nervous system for weeks, months, or even years. pathdoc/Shutterstock.com

Chronic pain after trauma may depend on what stress gene variation you carry

Did you know that trauma, even when there is no tissue or nerve damage, can cause chronic pain? Exactly how much pain and who is most vulnerable depends on which 'stress genes' we carry.
Instructor Sensei Giuseppe of Kids Kicking Cancer Italy, teaching a young cancer patient in Bergamo, Italy, on June 6, 2018. Elimelech Goldberg/Kids Kicking Cancer Italy

Treating pain in children can teach us about treating pain in adults

Children with cancer often experience terrible pain. Adults who treat them are determined to lessen their suffering. Can the lessons from helping kids with cancer pain inform treatment for adults in pain?
Physical therapists Steven Hunter and Laura Hayes teach an unidentified patient lumbar stabilization exercises at the Equal Access Clinic in Gainesville, Florida. Maria Belen Farias, UF Health Photography

Physical therapy could lower need for opioids, but lack of money and time are hurdles

As the nation grapples with its opioid addiction epidemic, one solution for many with chronic joint pain and back pain could be physical therapy. But it's often underutilized. Here's why.
Pain lets us know when there is something wrong, but sometimes our brains can trick us. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Trust Me I’m An Expert: The science of pain

Trust Me I’m An Expert: The science of pain. The Conversation58,7 MB (download)
Our podcast Trust Me, I'm An Expert, goes beyond the headlines and asks researchers to explain the evidence on issues making news. Today, we're talking pain and what science says about managing it.
shutterstock.com

Anthill 19: Pain

Pain is something everyone experiences. This episode of The Anthill podcast explores how and why it works in our brains, what kinds of drugs are being developed to reduce pain, and whether or not robots of the future should be built so that they experience pain.
There is growing evidence for the use of cannabis in treating opioid addiction. (Shutterstock)

Legal weed: An accidental solution to the opioid crisis?

As Canada moves towards legalization of cannabis in 2018, there is growing evidence of the drug's potential to treat opioid addiction itself, as well as the chronic pain that often drives it.
Our brains tell our bodies to move differently when we have pain. from shutterstock.com

Can the way we move after injury lead to chronic pain?

Our brains tell our bodies to move differently when we have pain. And there is emerging evidence to show changing how we move could actually contribute to the development of chronic pain.
More young Australians face the daunting task of trying to live a ‘normal’ life while dealing with the after-effects of cancer. Greg Raines/Unsplash

Life interrupted: young people need help moving forward after cancer

If you’re an Australian teenager or young adult diagnosed with cancer, there’s good news: overall survival rates are good and getting better. But what can you expect from life after cancer treatment?

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