Artikel-artikel mengenai Extreme weather

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Storm clouds move over the Illawarra south of Sydney on Wednesday, November 28 2018. Sydney received more than a month’s worth of rain in just two hours, with Observatory Hill recording 84.6mm by 7am. The November average is 83.8mm. Dean Lewins/AAP

Sydney storms could be making the Queensland fires worse

Bushfires across Queensland are fanned by high winds pushed north by a strong low in NSW.
The Bureau of Meteorology’s tropical cyclone outlook is out today. AAP Image/Bureau of Meteorology, Japan Meteorological Agency

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: Cyclone season approacheth, but this year there’s a twist

Cyclone season approacheth, but this year there’s a twist. The Conversation, CC BY31,4 MB (download)
Australia must come to terms with some fundamental shifts in our weather patterns. This month, Andrew Watkins from the BOM and climate scientist Joelle Gergis explore what's in store.
As extreme weather events, like Hurricane Florence, become more common it is time to ask what it will take for the world to finally tackle climate change. Encouragingly, there may be a historical precedent: Victoria London’s handling of the ‘Great Stink’, where growth had turned the River Thames into an open sewer. EPA/JIM LO SCALZO

Will 2018 be the year of climate action? Victorian London’s ‘Great Stink’ sewer crisis might tell us

As climate extremes mount, let's reflect on Victorian London's 'Great Stink' sewage crisis - when things finally became so bad authorities were forced to accept evidence, reject sceptics, and act.
The British First Fleet knew little of conditions in Port Jackson, later Sydney Cove, before their arrival. George Edwards Peacock, State Library of New South Wales.

Black skies and raging seas: how the First Fleet got a first taste of Australia’s unforgiving climate

When the First Fleet sailed into Sydney Cove in 1788, they entered an ancient and unforgiving landscape. A new book charts Australians' relationship with one of the world's most volatile climates.
Floods in South East Queensland follow a 40-year cycle, and planners should take note. AAP Image

Floods don’t occur randomly, so why do we still plan as if they do?

Engineering practice assumes that floods are randomly distributed but science suggests they are not. This raises questions about the reliability of flood infrastructure and management strategies.
People collect water piped in from a mountain creek in Utuado, Puerto Rico on Oct. 14, 2017, in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans were still without running water. AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa

Why climate change is worsening public health problems

Climate change threatens to widen the health gap between the haves and have-nots. Here's why addressing environmental issues that drive poor health is a starting point.
Extreme cold weather in Atlanta, Ga., on Jan. 3, 2018. AP Photo/David Goldman

Climate change and weather extremes: Both heat and cold can kill

Many parts of the US have experienced extreme heat or extreme cold in the past year. Recent research projects that climate change will increase deaths from both types of weather, especially cold spells.

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