Artikel-artikel mengenai Hurricane Maria

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People in the U.S. and the Caribbean share vulnerability to climate change-related disasters, but only in the Caribbean is the public truly worried. Why? US Navy

Caribbean residents see climate change as a severe threat but most in US don’t — here’s why

New research suggests politics and risk perception may explain why the US and Caribbean see climate change so differently, though both places are ever more vulnerable to powerful hurricanes.
Colin Kaepernick, centre, and his San Francisco teammates kneel during the national anthem before an NFL football game in 2016. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

What Colin Kaepernick can teach us about citizenship

Much of the discussion about "Take a Knee" has overlooked the issues of justice and social exclusion, and especially environmental matters. That's something to think about during the Super Bowl.
The U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency deleted — but later restored — key statistics on its web page about the percentage of Puerto Ricans living without drinking water and electricity. In this photo from October 2017, Roberto Figueroa Caballero sits in his wall-less home after Hurricane Maria devastated the island. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa, File)

Scientific information is the key to democracy

The U.S. government continues to wage a fight against scientific information. Without it, the public can do little to address environmental and economic inequality.
Trees and power lines in Puerto Rico, damaged by Hurricane Maria in September. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

2017: the year in extreme weather

2017 brought wild, wacky and even deadly weather. Australia was hit by heatwaves and torrential rains, plus some surprisingly cool spells. Hurricanes hit America, and a killer monsoon lashed Asia.
Though much of Puerto Rico remains devastated by Hurricane Maria, people are preparing to celebrate the holidays. Lorie Shaull/flickr

Puerto Ricans aren’t giving up on Christmas

It's said Puerto Rico has the longest Christmas in the world, a noisy two-month celebration that goes through mid-January. Can the holidays still happen in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria?
Two months after Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, the island remains devastated. Here, a photo taken outside Barranquitas, Puerto Rico, on Nov. 10 shows downed trees and a washed-out road. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Puerto Rico two months after Maria: 5 essential reads

Scholars answer key questions about Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Huricane Maria, which destroyed the island two months ago.
The intensity of heavy downpours in Houston has increased dramatically since the 1950s, leading some people to argue the city’s disaster planning and infrastructure are not up-to-date. AP Photo/David J. Phillip

Can cities get smarter about extreme weather?

It's not just about rebuilding infrastructure after storms: Cities need to systematically rethink their knowledge systems which are at the heart of urban resilience.
Soldiers deliver food and water following Hurricane Maria. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Maria will fundamentally change US policy toward Puerto Rico

Two hurricanes in Puerto Rico's past fundamentally transformed the island's economy and politics. Maria will be the third, says a historian.
Plush toys, recovered from a flooded home, hang out to dry on a wrought iron gate in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Ramon Espinosa/AP

The mental health toll of Puerto Rico’s prolonged power outages

Long after the hurricane's over and the power comes back, residents can still experience lasting mental health issues.
He didn’t throw paper towels in Texas. Why Puerto Rico? AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Is racial bias driving Trump’s neglect of Puerto Rico?

Evidence shows that US taxpayers are less willing to support extensive disaster relief when the victims are not white. Could that explain the Trump administration's lackluster support for Puerto Rico?

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