Lecturer in Alternative Energy, University of Oxford

Masaō Ashtine completed his PhD in 2016 at the University of Cambridge (Cambridge Trust Scholar), where he researched climate change implications for the UK's wind energy sector. This followed 6 years at York University in Toronto, Canada, where he gained his BSc and MSc Degrees in Environmental Sciences and Climate Modelling respectively. Masaō recently completed a Lectureship at the University of the West Indies in Jamaica in 2019 where he produced many insights around the renewable energy sector in the Caribbean. He is currently at the Oxford e-Research Centre (OeRC) at the University of Oxford, working as a Postdoctoral Researcher for Project LEO (Local Energy Oxfordshire), a £40M+ Oxfordshire project that aims to increase efficient pathways for local energy systems through flexibility services and marketplace optimisation. Masaō is also the co-founder and Managing Director for the Journal of Caribbean Environmental Sciences and Renewable Energy (CESaRE), a bespoke peer-review journal for the Caribbean which features many innovative and modern avenues for the dissemination of research across the region to a broad audience.

Experience

  • 2019–present
    Postdoctoral associate, University of Oxford
  • 2018–2019
    Lecturer in Alternative Energy , University of the West Indies

Education

  • 2017 
    University of Cambridge, PhD

Publications

  • 2019
    A Review of Caribbean Geothermal Energy Resource Potential, The West Indian Journal of Engineering
  • 2019
    Pathways to climate change mitigation and stable energy by 100% renewable for a small island: Jamaica as an example, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews
  • 2018
    Advancing the Caribbean Energy Landscape – A Comprehensive Review of the State of Electric Vehicles and Storage Systems, The Caribbean Academy of Sciences
  • 2016
    Assessment of wind energy potential over Ontario and Great Lakes using the NARR data: 1980–2012, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews
  • 2016
    Feasibility of small wind turbines in Ontario: Integrating power curves with wind trends, Resources