Australian National University

ANU was established, in 1946, to advance the cause of learning and research for the nation. It is consistently ranked among the world’s best universities and many ANU graduates go on to become leaders in government, industry, research and academia.

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Displaying 1741 - 1760 of 1951 articles

Are the benefits of openness worth the risk of releasing a new superflu? Ars Electronica

Avian superflu and the censorship of science

Two studies, one carried out in the Netherlands by Ron Fouchier and the other in Japan by Yoshihiro Kawaoka, are causing controversy over the creation of a new strain of H5N1 Avian Influenza or “bird flu…
There’s a lot of carbon in there. John Tann

Is using native forests for energy really carbon-neutral?

Australia’s forest conflict gets easier to solve as every day passes. In reality, the conflict will solve itself if the government can just resist reviving the environmentally and economically inferior…
The Green Climate Fund needs to attract developed countries’ money with a few nest eggs. CaptPiper

Empty shell or nest egg: what next for climate finance after Durban?

DURBAN CLIMATE CHANGE CONFERENCE: One of the main achievements of the Durban climate change conference was establishing the Green Climate Fund. This is expected to channel a fair amount of the US$100 billion…
How can we stop people putting themselves in peril? AAP/Josh Jerga

Five ways to prevent more asylum seeker tragedies

Last weekend, an overcrowded fishing boat sank off the coast of Indonesia with more than 200 asylum seekers on board. In Australia, the political blame game started soon after with both sides trying to…
Japan has lost its taste for nuclear, which means higher emissions and less energy security. AAP

Powering Japan after Fukushima

Recently, Jenny Corbett, Executive Director of the Australia-Japan Research School at ANU, sat down with Tatsuo Hatta, Professor Emeritus at Osaka University and a former President of the Japanese Economic…
If the republic is going to be put back on the political agenda in 2012, more will need to step up and talk more about the issue publicly. Flickr/GregTheBusker

Vive la republique! Why Nicola Roxon’s push for constitutional reform needs supporters

The new Attorney-General, Nicola Roxon, has made her intention clear to reignite the debate on Australia becoming a republic. On taking up the new position, she took the opportunity to stake out her position…
There’s no shortage of hype around thorium, but how justified is the excitement? AzureGrackel

Thoughts from a thorium ‘symposium’

You have probably heard at least a little about thorium. There are certainly advocates out there who strongly believe it could help solve the world’s energy problems. The idea is that thorium-based nuclear…
Michael Somare (right) and his deputy Sam Abal claim to be rightful leaders of PNG. AAP/Eoin Blackwell

Explainer: political crisis in Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea has been gripped by political turmoil for almost a week now. Two men – Michale Somare and Peter O'Neill – are currently claiming to be the rightful prime minister of the nation. Both have…
Space touches all of us – but how can we stay in touch with space? The iconoclastic yet iconic ionic icon

Australia in space: what’s our policy?

Almost every aspect of our lives is in some way touched by space science and technology. As such, the public policy implications are many and varied. Services provided via space-based technologies are…
Domestic solar panel use has risen dramatically in recent years; commercial uptake can’t be far behind. EPA/Patrick Pleul

We’re set to hit our renewable energy targets – now let’s aim higher

A recent report by the Clean Energy Council claims that the capacity of domestic solar panels in Australia has increased 35-fold in the past three years. This (among other factors) means we are well on…
A satellite picture of Cyclone Yasi from the Japanese weather satellite MTSAT 1R. German Meteorological Society/DPA

Australia in space: letting others watch us … but at what cost?

Australia’s Chief Scientist Ian Chubb has more than once described the Australia of the past as a “mendicant country” regarding science. While this is a controversial, perhaps overly-broad, generalisation…
New infrastructure is putting the Australian space industry on the map. RSAA

Australia in space: looking out and looking in

Space exploration is one of the few science-rich human endeavours that captivates both expert and layperson alike. There is a mystery – a romanticism – associated with space research and technology that…
There’s a contradiction between classical and quantum theories. TonZ

Millennium Prize: the Yang-Mills Existence and Mass Gap problem

MILLENNIUM PRIZE SERIES: The Millennium Prize Problems are seven mathematics problems laid out by the Clay Mathematics Institute in 2000. They’re not easy—_ a correct solution to any one results in a US$1,000,000…
Protesters have a point: big polluters’ approach to patents isn’t helping developing nations clean up. Tck, Tck, Tck

Climate justice for intellectual property at Durban

DURBAN CLIMATE CHANGE CONFERENCE: In a global day of action for climate justice, thousands of protestors complained about the slow progress in international debates on climate change at the United Nations…
Indigenous Australians systematically burnt grasslands to reduce fuel and stop fires raging out of control. Flickr/pietroizzo

The biggest estate on earth: how Aborigines made Australia

Aboriginal people worked hard to make plants and animals abundant, convenient and predictable. By distributing plants and associating them in mosaics, then using these to lure and locate animals, Aborigines…

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