Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute

The Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute is dedicated to reducing ill health and mortality caused by the effects of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. With a focus on diagnosis, prevention and treatment, Baker’s work also extends to wide-scale community studies. Baker IDI and its researchers interact with and obtain funding from a variety of external partners, including government, private donors and industry partners.

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Les personnes qui travaillent toute la journée assises pourraient connaître des probèmes de régulation du glucose, qui est le principal carburant du cerveau. Shutterstock

Rester trop longtemps assis nuit à votre cerveau

Plusieurs études suggèrent que l’approvisionnement du cerveau en glucose est défaillant chez les personnes qui passent beaucoup de temps assises. L’impact réel sur la santé cérébrale reste incertain.
The type of sugar in popular soft drinks varies from country to country even if the brand name is the same. from shutterstock.com

We know too much sugar is bad for us, but do different sugars have different health effects?

A recent study found Australian soft drinks had higher concentrations of glucose than US soft drinks, which had more fructose. Does this mean Australian drinks are worse for health than US drinks?
Our heart works hard for every second we are alive. Eventually its processes will wear out. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Heart disease: what happens when the ticker wears and tears

Given our increasing lifespan, we need to better understand how and why the cardiovascular system ages and whether we can slow down the processes involved.
Metformin was originally developed from natural compounds found in the plant known as French lilac. Vlad Proklov/Flickr

Weekly Dose: metformin, the diabetes drug developed from French lilac

Metformin has been used to treat diabetes since the late 1950s. It is now on the World Health Organisation's List of Essential Medicines needed for a basic health care system.
Footballer Adam Goodes was daring to speak of things that many Australians would prefer to be ignorant of. AAP/Dean Lewins

The land we play on: equality doesn’t mean justice

Until we see a marked change in the stories that are told, together with a shift from inclusion to social justice, the national story of Australian sport will remain very, very white.
Birth registration is required for many activities throughout a person’s life yet in some states up to 20% of Aboriginal children aren’t registered. Marianna Massey/AAP

Invisible children: research shows up to one in five Aboriginal newborns aren’t registered

Around 20% of Aboriginal births in Western Australia between 1996 and 2012 weren't registered, new research shows. This has many social and health ramifications for their future.
Birthing on country generally refers to an Aboriginal mother giving birth to her child on the lands of their ancestors. Skylines/Shutterstock

Why we need to support Aboriginal women’s choice to give birth on country

Where birthing on country is not offered, women leave their families weeks before birth. Or she can choose to give birth in her community without skilled birth attendants, which is risky.
Diabetes is characterised by higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood. Leon Ephraim/Unsplash

How Australians Die: cause #5 – diabetes

Diabetes is a leading cause of death as well as of heart attacks, strokes, amputations, kidney failure, depression and severe infections – all of which themselves contribute to premature death.
Coronary heart disease is almost always a consequence of atherosclerosis; a build-up of cholesterol and other material in the walls of our arteries. Heart Attack Heaven/Flickr

How Australians Die: cause #1 – heart diseases and stroke

Global deaths from heart disease rose from 12.3 million in 1990 to 17.3 million in 2013. Most of the increase occurred in developing countries and in disadvantaged people in developed countries.

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