Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute

The Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute is dedicated to reducing ill health and mortality caused by the effects of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. With a focus on diagnosis, prevention and treatment, Baker’s work also extends to wide-scale community studies. Baker IDI and its researchers interact with and obtain funding from a variety of external partners, including government, private donors and industry partners.

Links

Displaying 41 - 60 of 82 articles

Lowering insulin doses can have dangerous effects on the body. Jill A Brown

Diabulimia: health versus body image in type 1 diabetes

Many people around the world take insulin injections to manage their type 1 diabetes. Although it’s essential for their health, some dangerously manipulate their treatment to lose weight. Insulin is a…
If we’re fit, does it matter what we weigh? Image from shutterstock.com

Viewpoints: can you be healthy at any weight?

Australians are getting heavier and, as a result, are more likely to suffer life-threatening illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes and strokes. But should we be worried about a bit of excess weight…
Prioritising physical activity and healthy eating is having a positive impact on childhood obesity in the United States. Korean Resource Center/Flickr

Lessons for Australia from US reversal of childhood obesity

Childhood obesity prevalence is alarmingly high in many developed countries; in Australia, one in four children is overweight or obese, while in the United States, it’s one in three. But recent American…
Whether or not you are feeding a cold or starving it makes little difference to the biology of a common cold. Image from shutterstock.com

Monday’s medical myth: feed a cold, starve a fever

This winter, most of us will catch a cold. Our kids will probably catch at least two or three. We all know you are supposed to feed a cold and starve a fever. But does it really make any difference if…
Infertility, high blood pressure, varicose viens and back pain have been attributed to leg crossing – but what does the evidence say? Image from shutterstock.com

Monday’s medical myth: crossing your legs is bad for your health

Almost everyone crosses their legs, whether it’s conscious or unconscious, for custom, for comfort, for effect, to stop your legs splaying, to take pressure off a foot, or for no reason at all. But is…
The best way to prevent type 2 diabetes is to lose your excess fat. Image from shutterstock.com

Explainer: what is diabetes?

To keep your body functioning, glucose must always be present in your blood. It’s as important as oxygen in the air you breathe. The brain can only function for a few minutes without either before it stops…
Venous thromboembolism is the fifth leading cause of death in Australia. Image from shutterstock.com

Explainer: what is deep vein thrombosis?

Living in Australia, we’re used to flying long distances. So you’ve probably wondered about the risk of developing a deep vein thrombosis. Perhaps you’ve even considered buying some pressure stockings…
Many people die while waiting for dialysis, or after finding the daily visits to a dialysis unit impossible to manage. Michael Coghlan

Diabetes among Indigenous Australians at crisis point

Diabetes rates in Australia are high but its prevalence in the Indigenous population is between three and four times higher than the rest of the population. And we are fast running out of time to stop…
Men generally prefer higher concentrations of sweet compared with women. Ethan

Monday’s medical myth: blame it on my sweet tooth

My wife says she has a sweet tooth. But doesn’t everyone? It’s universal to the human condition (as well as the human palate) to like something sweet. It may even be an evolutionary advantage to seek out…
Australians from higher socioeconomic backgrounds are less likely to struggle with excess weight. Ed Yourdon

Education, wealth and the place you live can affect your weight

OBESE NATION: It’s time to admit it – Australia is becoming an obese nation. This series looks at how this has happened and, more importantly, what we can do to stop the obesity epidemic. Here, Kathryn…
One in four Australians are now obese. But when – and how – did we gain this weight? Kyle May

Mapping Australia’s collective weight gain

OBESE NATION: It’s time to admit it - Australia is becoming an obese nation. Today we launch a series looking at how this has happened and, more importantly, what we can do to stop the obesity epidemic…
Many people blame laziness and ready access to attractive, energy-dense foods for the obesity epidemic. modenadude/Flickr

Simple answers to the obesity epidemic block solutions

Like politics, football and global warming, obesity is a topic that attracts huge attention in the media as well as talk on the street and in coffee lounges. This is not surprising since it is the most…
If any difference exists at all, it’s imperceptibly small, at less than 0.2°C. Ms Cafe

Monday’s medical myth: men are hotter than women

Holding a body close to you, it’s easy to appreciate the warmth a human body can generate. Humans are “warm-blooded” animals. We’re able to effectively maintain a stable internal temperature, even on cold…
Researchers are only now investigating the link between type 2 diabetes and frailty. nyxmedia

Type 2 diabetes: frailty isn’t an inevitable consequence of ageing

People with type 2 diabetes are at risk of a number of complications from the disease such as nerve damage, kidney disease and vision disorders. So it’s no surprise that clinicians devote a lot of time…
Aboriginal elders will help lay the path for health-care innovation in Indigenous communities. aia web team

Indigenous ageing: walking backwards into the future

The notion of walking backwards into the future describes the value we can derive from remembering and understanding our past, in order to best prepare for a better tomorrow. We can’t do this without properly…
Those who continue to be physically and mentally active throughout their life seem to age more slowly. Garry Knight

Why we can’t live forever: understanding the mechanisms of ageing

Ageing is the sum of many processes acting in concert to produce the signs and symptoms we know as “getting old”. Of course, there’s no way to stop the ageing process, but a better understanding of the…
For baby boomers, 70 is the new 50. Dr Hemmert

Defining old age: Baby Boomers to rewrite the books

At the turn of the 20th century, life expectancy in Australia was just 55 years for men and 59 for women. Thanks to medical breakthroughs and technological advances, the average Australian woman can now…
Listening to whale sounds on your in-flight earphones may just, and only just, get you through the main course without incident. redjar

Airplane food tastes strange … and here’s why

Many people find being high up an unpleasant experience. This is not just mountain sickness or acrophobia – it turns out our taste buds too have no head for heights. Taste is not just determined by the…
Peanuts may alleviate some symptoms but they won’t cure your motion sickness. Jetstar Airways

Monday’s medical myth: peanuts stop motion sickness

At the start of The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, the ever-resourceful Ford Prefect buys four packets of salted peanuts, ostensibly to prevent motion sickness. We sometimes get them on flights too…

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors