CQUniversity Australia

Originally founded in Rockhampton in 1967 as the Queensland Institute of Technology (QIT) Capricornia, CQUniversity was awarded full university status in 1992, and now has more than 30,000 students spread across Australia. CQUniversity is the only Australian university with a campus in every mainland state of Australia.

In 2014, CQUniversity merged with CQ TAFE bringing together more than 175 years combined experience in the delivery of education and vocational training, and establishing Queensland’s first dual sector, comprehensive university. The University now delivers more than 300 education and training offerings, from short courses and certificates, through to undergraduate, postgraduate and research degrees, with seamless pathways available between all levels of study.

A renowned research institution and a benchmark leader for how Universities should engage with community and industry, its record of achievement over the past few years is matched only by the ambitious aspirations it has set itself over the coming five years, with a continued expansion of student success, research excellence, social innovation and community engagement firmly in its sights.

CQUniversity’s unique vision, diversity, outreach, engagement, research, learning and teaching, and inclusiveness have led to it being recognised among the top universities in the world and as Australia’s only Changemaker Campus by global social innovation group Ashoka U.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 170 articles

The Ukrainian airliner went down shortly after take-off from Tehran’s airport. Western intelligence has indicated an Iranian missile might have been responsible. ABEDIN TAHERKENAREH/EPA

What investigators should be looking for in the Iran plane crash: an expert explains

Key evidence from the wreckage can show if the plane experienced engine trouble or was hit by a missile. But first, Iran must decide how much outside help it will accept in an investigation.
Working out where Aboriginal remains came from will in take researchers from several disciplines working together. Michael Westaway

Returning to country: we should use genetics, geology and more to repatriate Aboriginal remains

It's not always easy to work out where Aboriginal remains came from, but science can help.
Dale Palmer prepares his home in NSW for the bushfires. The decision to stay and defend one’s property requires a person to be mentally, as well as physically, prepared. AAP/Darren Pateman

It’s hard to breathe and you can’t think clearly – if you defend your home against a bushfire, be mentally prepared

In catastrophic fire conditions, leaving early is the only safe option. But in other conditions, one thing that's often overlooked in decisions to stay or go is how mentally tough you need to be.
Many high school students are politically engaged. But how would they change the preamble to the Constitution? AAP/Lukas Coch

Young Australians champion ‘democracy’ and ‘freedom’ in designing constitutional change

At a recent constitutional convention, high school students from across the country designed a new preamble to the Constitution to bring it into line with their idea of how Australia should be.
A retouched photo of Mary (Mollie) Dean from Sydney newspaper Truth (1 February 1931). Dean, who was murdered in Melbourne in 1930, was the subject of two Australian books published in 2018. Public domain/The Conversation

Inside the story: humanising a cold case victim – writing the life and brutal death of Mollie Dean

True crime-related storytelling has shrugged off its former low-brow baggage. Two recent Australian books show how victims' stories can be told sensitively and humanely.
Why would striking students end up in the ‘dole’ queue’ when they’re seeking to understand a global issue, taking action and clearly articulating their perspective? Julien De Rosa/AAP

Students striking for climate action are showing the exact skills employers look for

When politicians caution against student strikes for climate action, they are going against the aims of Australia's curriculum to develop citizens with a social conscience, willing to take action.
Heading for failure: shifting the burden of social development programs to business enterprises may prove to be a huge mistake by India’s national government. Shutterstock

India’s grand experiment in corporate social responsibility is heading for trouble

India requires large enterprises to spend 2% of their profits on corporate social responsibility projects. It's a bold idea, but looks doomed to fail.
Without significant tree cover, dry and dusty landscapes can result. Don Driscoll

To reduce fire risk and meet climate targets, over 300 scientists call for stronger land clearing laws

A new petition is urging state and federal governments to rein in Australia's rampant land clearing, which worsens the risk of bushfires and threatens to undo the work of the Emissions Reduction Fund.
An example of a typical dingo. Photograph depicts a male from K’gari-Fraser Island (Queensland). John Williams

The dingo is a true-blue, native Australian species

Of all Australia’s wildlife, one stands out as having an identity crisis: the dingo. New research has found the dingo is its own species, distinct from 'wild dogs'.

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