Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health

The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health is one of the world’s top six brain research centres. We employ 600 research and support staff and educate 90 post-graduate students each year. Our scientists comprise the largest neuroscience research team in Australia.

Our teams work across a variety of disease states such as stroke, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, motor neuron disease, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, mental illnesses including schizophrenia, depression and addiction. We are world leaders in imaging technology, stroke rehabilitation and epidemiological studies.

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The fashion advice is generally to tighten ties so they’re tight but not too tight. from www.shutterstock.com

Research Check: do neckties reduce blood supply to the brain?

Wearing a tie that causes slight discomfort can reduce blood flow to the brain by 7.5%, but the reduction is unlikely to cause any physical symptoms, which generally begin at a reduction of 10%.
Statistics has Guinness to thank for the Student’s t-test. Flickr/Scott Thompson

The genius at Guinness and his statistical legacy

A statistical method widely used today by scientists and others is all thanks to a statistician at a Guinness brewery whose work was published anonymously more than a century ago.
A hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease is gradual deterioration of memory. Roman Kraft/Unsplash

What causes Alzheimer’s disease? What we know, don’t know and suspect

Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, but treatments are still far from successful in clinical trials. Here is what we know about the disease, and what is yet to be uncovered.
Why do we retain some memories better than others? Wes Mountain/The Conversation

Comic explainer: how memory works

The Florey Institute's Dr Jee Hyun Kim explains how the different aspects of memory work and why attention is the most important element of improving your memory in this long-form comic explainer.
Our language abilities are enabled by a co-ordinated network of brain regions that have evolved to give humans a sophisticated ability to communicate. [bastian.]/Flickr

What brain regions control our language? And how do we know this?

When you read this text, certain regions in your brain begin working more than others. Advanced imaging allows scientists to map the brain networks responsible for understanding language.
Motor symptoms of Parkinson’s include tremors, stiffness and slowness or loss of spontaneous movement. Lisa/Flickr

What causes Parkinson’s disease? What we know, don’t know and suspect

Parkinson’s disease is the second-most-prevalent neurodegenerative condition in Australia, with an estimated 70,000 living with the disease. But what do we know about the causes and risk factors?
The health sector can learn from other industries that turn to operations research to fix everyday challenges. Anna Jurkovska/Shutterstock

Hospitals don’t need increased funding, they need to make better use of what they’ve got

Fixing the hospital system is not just a matter of more funding. Hospitals need to work smarter, not harder.
The brain implant sends signals to anything from a bionic prosthetic limb, to a full body ‘exoskeleton’ Rex Bionics

How ‘mind-controlled’ bionic devices could help quadriplegics walk

A 3cm-long stent containing 12 electrodes could one day help people living with spinal cord injury to walk with the power of thought.
Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological conditions in the world. from shutterstock.com

Epilepsy: sorting the myths from the facts of a common disorder

Saying someone has epilepsy is a little like saying they're ill. Its cause can vary from a brain tumour to an inherited genetic condition, the consequence of injury or a disorder affecting the brain.
Epigenetic molecules play a different melody on different people’s genomes, and this might be contributing to some developing autism. Jesse Kruger/Flickr

Music of the genome hits a discord with autism

The epigenetic 'musicians' that play our genomes in different ways might help us understand the causes of autism.
The human brain leaves computers behind with its endless capacity for problem solving, innovation and invention. Humphrey King/Flickr

Health Check: four key ways to improve your brain health

The human brain is the most extraordinary and complex object in the known universe, a kilogram and a half of soft tissue that, at its peak, leaves computers behind with its endless capacity for problem…
People who stay mentally stimulated and physically active can delay onset of cognitive decline. Daniel Erkstam/Flickr

Older people may be better learners than we think

Older people may be able to learn more from visual information than their younger counterparts, according to a study published…
The amount of sun exposure and associated vitamin D production is believed to underlie the geographical gradient in multiple sclerosis prevalance. Thomas Abbs/Flickr

Explainer: multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is a neurological disease affecting almost 25,000 Australians and more than 2.4 million people worldwide. It’s one of the leading causes of disability in young adults. Typically, the…
The curious want to know more and can remember more. Flickr/Wagner T Cassimiro Aranha

Curiosity changes the brain to boost memory and learning

The more curious we are about a topic, the easier it is to remember not only information about that topic, but also other…

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