Human Sciences Research Council

The HSRC was established in 1968 as South Africa’s statutory research agency and has grown to become the largest dedicated research institute in the social sciences and humanities on the African continent, doing cutting-edge public research in areas that are crucial to development.

Our mandate is to inform the effective formulation and monitoring of government policy; to evaluate policy implementation; to stimulate public debate through the effective dissemination of research-based data and fact-based research results; to foster research collaboration; and to help build research capacity and infrastructure for the human sciences.

The Council conducts large-scale, policy-relevant, social-scientific research for public sector users, non-governmental organisations and international development agencies. Research activities and structures are closely aligned with South Africa’s national development priorities.

The HSRC’s integrated research programmes provide single points of entry – complete with a critical mass of researchers – for interdisciplinary and problem-orientated research in the following areas:

  • Africa Institute of South Africa
  • Democracy, Governance and Service Delivery
  • Economic Performance and Development
  • Education and Skills Development
  • Human and Social Development
  • Population Health, Health Systems and Innovation
  • Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS, STIs and TB.

A cross-cutting entity, Research Use and Impact Assessment, seeks to extend and enhance the use and impact of scientific research from the HSRC and other sources of research; and to manage the HSRC’s relationships, reputation and brand.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 34 articles

South African companies have strengths on which to build on, particularly in telecoms Shutterstock

South Africa’s new economic proposals highlight the role of services

Services have not featured strongly in the economic strategies of developing countries. However, South Africa's recently published economic reform proposals point to a greater role for services.
South Africa’s labour market is more favourable to men than to women. The 4IR may widen the gap. Sunshine Seeds/Shutterstock/Editorial use only

The fourth industrial revolution risks leaving women behind

The world of the fourth industrial revolution looks set to be one dominated by forms of knowledge and industries -- like science and technology -- that have long been dominated by men.
South Africans with jobs fear that automation could make them redundant. Shutterstock

South Africans are upbeat about new technologies, but worried about jobs

The governments needs to adjust its agenda to take on board concerns voiced by citizens about the impact of technological changes.
Are South Africa’s biggest political parties offering anything new to inject much-needed life into the ailing education system? flickr/ GovernmentZA

South Africa’s main parties all have plans for education. What’s missing?

Here's what researchers found when they assessed the election manifestos of South Africa's three biggest political parties' and what they say about education.

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