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Displaying 1 - 20 of 143 articles

Landscape of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah, one of the most abundant fossil fields in the world. P. David Polly, 2018

Shrinking the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is a disaster for paleontology

Twenty-two years ago, President Clinton established Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument for paleontological conservation. As the Trump administration shrinks its borders, that mission is jeopardized.
Other cultures view dementia differently. Could they help us be better caregivers? BlurryMe/Shutterstock.com

Could different cultures teach us something about dementia?

More than 16 million people in the U.S. take care of people with dementia. Could we learn something from how other cultures view dementia as more of a social disease rather than a lonely one?
Medical social workers perform many tasks for patients, but the work is taking a high toll on them, leading to burnout and attrition. YAKOBCHUK VIACHESLAV/Shutterstock

When caring hurts: Attrition among social workers, medicine’s unsung heroes

Medical social workers coordinate care, an especially important job in complicated cases. Just as nurses and doctors are feeling burned out, these unsung heroes are feeling the burn, too. Here's why that's dangerous.
People who share potential misinformation on Twitter (in purple) rarely get to see corrections or fact-checking (in orange). Shao et al.

Misinformation and biases infect social media, both intentionally and accidentally

Information on social media can be misleading because of biases in three places – the brain, society and algorithms. Scholars are developing ways to identify and display the effects of these biases.
A streamlined NEPA review of replacing New York’s Tappan Zee Bridge over the Hudson River, which would normally take 3-5 years, was completed in 1.5 years. Jim Henderson

Trump proposal to weaken project reviews threatens the ‘Magna Carta of environmental law’

Do environmental reviews delay large-scale projects? The Trump administration says yes, but studies show that these reviews lead to better results and can even save time and money.
Frankenstein’s monster in the Hollywood Wax Museum. The fictional character first appeared in Mary Shelley’s novel in 1818. www.shutterstock.com

What Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein teaches us about the need for mothers

By showing us a world from which mothers are largely absent, Mary Shelley reminds us that the genius of motherhood lies less in biological reproduction than in the capacity to love.
In Leo Tolstoy’s ‘Anna Karenina,’ each character approaches marriage with a different set of expectations – and many succumb to disappointment. Internet Archive Book Images

As the Royal Wedding approaches, what can one of the world’s greatest novels teach us about marriage?

In their coverage of Meghan and Harry, the media are focusing on all of the wrong things. Thankfully, Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy had sharp insights about marriage that still resonate today.
Seorang tentara Suriah mengambil gambar kerusakan Syrian Scientific Research Center yang diserang oleh militer Amerika Serikat, Inggris, dan Prancis. AP Photo/Hassan Ammar

Krisis Suriah, senjata kimia, dan batas-batas hukum internasional

Amerika Serikat seharusnya bekerja untuk menghentikan serangan senjata kimia di masa depan terhadap masyarakat sipil dengan mensponsori inisiatif internasional untuk memperbarui Piagam PBB.
President Donald Trump, left, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Will US-Japan friendship survive uncertainty in Asia?

US-Japan relations are under pressure. As leaders of the two countries meet this week, a scholar tells the story of the exchange program that made such a difference to American attitudes toward Japan.
A Syrian soldier films the damage of the Syrian Scientific Research Center which was attacked by U.S., British and French military strikes. AP Photo/Hassan Ammar

Syria, chemical weapons and the limits of international law

The United Nations Charter doesn't allow the use of military force to prevent chemical weapons attacks — no matter how evil — without UN Security Council approval. That needs to change.

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