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Squirrel Hill neighbors embrace, after hearing of the shootings at the Tree of Life synagogue, Oct. 27, 2018. Keith Srakocic/AP Photo

How Mister Rogers’ message of love might help us now

Fred Rogers was not blind to evil, but he still taught love in the face of it. His real neighborhood under attack, his neighbors showed love and forgiveness that can teach and inspire us all.
An Atlanta hospital set up a mobile ER to deal with the large number of flu cases. AP Photo/David Goldman

Why did the flu kill 80,000 Americans last year?

Part of the problem was a mismatch between the influenza strains circulating and the vaccine available. Here's how annual flu shots are formulated.
Warmer temperatures could lead to more zones of the country that make good breeding sites for mosquitoes. Apichart Meesri / Shutterstock.com

Is climate change causing a rise in the number of mosquito and tick-borne diseases?

Is our changing climate making regions of the US more suitable for ticks and mosquitoes that spread diseases? Or is the climate changing human physiology making us more vulnerable?
Landscape of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah, one of the most abundant fossil fields in the world. P. David Polly, 2018

Shrinking the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is a disaster for paleontology

Twenty-two years ago, President Clinton established Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument for paleontological conservation. As the Trump administration shrinks its borders, that mission is jeopardized.
Other cultures view dementia differently. Could they help us be better caregivers? BlurryMe/Shutterstock.com

Could different cultures teach us something about dementia?

More than 16 million people in the U.S. take care of people with dementia. Could we learn something from how other cultures view dementia as more of a social disease rather than a lonely one?
Medical social workers perform many tasks for patients, but the work is taking a high toll on them, leading to burnout and attrition. YAKOBCHUK VIACHESLAV/Shutterstock

When caring hurts: Attrition among social workers, medicine’s unsung heroes

Medical social workers coordinate care, an especially important job in complicated cases. Just as nurses and doctors are feeling burned out, these unsung heroes are feeling the burn, too. Here's why that's dangerous.
People who share potential misinformation on Twitter (in purple) rarely get to see corrections or fact-checking (in orange). Shao et al.

Misinformation and biases infect social media, both intentionally and accidentally

Information on social media can be misleading because of biases in three places – the brain, society and algorithms. Scholars are developing ways to identify and display the effects of these biases.
A streamlined NEPA review of replacing New York’s Tappan Zee Bridge over the Hudson River, which would normally take 3-5 years, was completed in 1.5 years. Jim Henderson

Trump proposal to weaken project reviews threatens the ‘Magna Carta of environmental law’

Do environmental reviews delay large-scale projects? The Trump administration says yes, but studies show that these reviews lead to better results and can even save time and money.

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