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The brain doesn’t cause lying. From www.shutterstock.com

Why you shouldn’t blame lying on the brain

A recent study suggested that the brain becomes accustomed to lying, making people merely puppets of their brains. That's too simple an explanation – and one that lets liars off the hook.
Go ahead, just let off some steam. 'Swearing' via www.shutterstock.com

Do we swear too much?

With the taboo on swearing loosening over the past few decades, will profanity lose its effectiveness in spoken language?
A bust of Alfred Nobel outside the Norwegian Nobel Institute. Tobias Schwarz/Reuters

The curious history of the Nobel Peace Prize

One of the greatest benefits of the Nobel Peace Prize is the fact that, once a year, it promotes a lively discussion about peace throughout the world.
The NFL joins the Age of Metrics. Chart with field via shutterstock.com

The NFL joins the data revolution in sports

With chips embedded in footballs in Thursday night games, the NFL is moving toward a data-driven future. How will fans, media and teams benefit?
Volunteers clean up after Hurricane Sandy. jim.henderson

Why money is an impoverished metric of generosity

There are few things Americans like more than lists and money, but ranking philanthropists on the monetary size of their giving distorts our understanding of generosity, argues one ethicist.
Volume rendered image of the external morphology of the foot bone shows the extent of expansion of the primary bone cancer beyond the surface of the bone. Patrick Randolph-Quinney (UCLAN)

What can a 1.7-million-year-old hominid fossil teach us about cancer?

Cancer is a deadly disease and would have been particularly lethal before the recent development of effective treatments. So why didn’t it – or our susceptibility to it – die out long ago?
Kenyan civil society activists protest against the extrajudicial killing of a human rights lawyer and his client. Restrictions against NGOs have intensified. Reuters/Thomas Mukoya

Kenya’s clampdown on civil society is against its self-interest

The government of Uhuru Kenyatta may wish to reconsider its repeated attacks against NGOs. The country as a whole is likely to benefit if the government softens its stance.
Residents of Flint, Michigan wait at a congressional hearing in Washington, D.C. on the water crisis. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

Clinton seizes on environmental justice but progress requires deep reforms

Hillary Clinton has elevated environmental justice to a high level as a presidential nominee, but as the Flint water crisis demonstrates, the deeper problem lies in ineffective government agencies.
Touch is a powerful tool in medicine. Hands via www.shutterstock.com.

Touch creates a healing bond in health care

Despite the rise of scanners, robots and other new medical technologies, the physician’s hand remains one of medicine’s most valuable diagnostic tools.

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