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Displaying 61 - 80 of 144 articles

'Secrets' via www.shutterstock.com

How should you read unnamed sources and leaks?

With an explosion of media outlets that don't adhere to mainstream journalistic standards, it's became difficult for readers to know whether to trust reports based on unnamed sources and leaks.
US soldiers in Afghanistan, 2015. AP Photo/Jonathan Ernst

Military honor in the age of Trump

As commander-in-chief, Trump will have a major impact in upholding the U.S. military's honor and ethics. A scholar at the U.S. Naval Academy considers if he is up to the task.
The incoming EPA will likely lean toward less oversight over state public health programs – and lax enforcement is one of the causes behind the Flint water crisis. Rebecca Cook/Reuters

Will a weakened EPA set environmental justice back?

The hostility of Scott Pruitt, Trump's nominee to head the EPA, toward climate change rules is well-known. But his anti-regulatory stance could easily set back years of work on environmental justice.
In the early stages of his campaign, Donald Trump eagerly made himself available to the press. As president, that’s likely to change. Joe Skipper/Reuters

Experts’ roundtable: The future of journalism in Trump’s America

How can journalists resist a master media manipulator, reach local communities and sift through fake news and propaganda? Media experts explore the challenges of covering the next administration.
Sharing election hashtags: Dots are Twitter accounts; lines show retweeting; larger dots are retweeted more. Red dots are likely bots; blue ones are likely humans. Clayton Davis

Misinformation on social media: Can technology save us?

If people can be conned into jeopardizing our children's lives, as they do when they opt out of immunizations, could they also be conned out of democracy?
The brain doesn’t cause lying. From www.shutterstock.com

Why you shouldn’t blame lying on the brain

A recent study suggested that the brain becomes accustomed to lying, making people merely puppets of their brains. That's too simple an explanation – and one that lets liars off the hook.
Go ahead, just let off some steam. 'Swearing' via www.shutterstock.com

Do we swear too much?

With the taboo on swearing loosening over the past few decades, will profanity lose its effectiveness in spoken language?
A bust of Alfred Nobel outside the Norwegian Nobel Institute. Tobias Schwarz/Reuters

The curious history of the Nobel Peace Prize

One of the greatest benefits of the Nobel Peace Prize is the fact that, once a year, it promotes a lively discussion about peace throughout the world.
The NFL joins the Age of Metrics. Chart with field via shutterstock.com

The NFL joins the data revolution in sports

With chips embedded in footballs in Thursday night games, the NFL is moving toward a data-driven future. How will fans, media and teams benefit?
Volunteers clean up after Hurricane Sandy. jim.henderson

Why money is an impoverished metric of generosity

There are few things Americans like more than lists and money, but ranking philanthropists on the monetary size of their giving distorts our understanding of generosity, argues one ethicist.
Volume rendered image of the external morphology of the foot bone shows the extent of expansion of the primary bone cancer beyond the surface of the bone. Patrick Randolph-Quinney (UCLAN)

What can a 1.7-million-year-old hominid fossil teach us about cancer?

Cancer is a deadly disease and would have been particularly lethal before the recent development of effective treatments. So why didn’t it – or our susceptibility to it – die out long ago?
Kenyan civil society activists protest against the extrajudicial killing of a human rights lawyer and his client. Restrictions against NGOs have intensified. Reuters/Thomas Mukoya

Kenya’s clampdown on civil society is against its self-interest

The government of Uhuru Kenyatta may wish to reconsider its repeated attacks against NGOs. The country as a whole is likely to benefit if the government softens its stance.

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