L’Université d’Ottawa/University of Ottawa

The University of Ottawa—A crossroads of cultures and ideas

The University of Ottawa is home to over 50,000 students, faculty and staff, who live, work and study in both French and English. Our campus is diverse with more than 300 undergraduate programs and 150 graduate degrees in 10 faculties. The university has an extensive co-op program boasting a 95 per cent placement rate. Our campus is a crossroads of cultures and ideas, where bold minds come together to inspire game-changing ideas. We are one of Canada’s top 10 research universities—our professors and researchers explore new approaches to today’s challenges. Ranked among the top 150 universities in the world, we attract exceptional thinkers and welcome diverse perspectives from across the globe.

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Displaying 81 - 100 of 101 articles

A commonly cited statistic that 60 to 90 percent of gender dysphoric children grow up not to be transgender is based on studies that are deeply flawed. (Shutterstock)

Why ‘rapid-onset gender dysphoria’ is bad science

'Rapid-onset gender dysphoria' suggests children are being persuaded into transgender identities before they know what that means. This theory is best explained by transphobia and research study biases.
The Shape of Water offers a clever allegory to Donald’s Trump’s presidency, with Michael Shannon’s character (on the left) representing some of the president’s worst qualities. (Kerry Hayes/Fox Searchlight Pictures)

The Shape of Water: An allegorical critique of Trump

Not everyone can escape to the ocean's depths to avoid the Trump presidency, but we can escape to the movies. 'The Shape of Water' reminds audiences of the humanity of those who are marginalized.
There are widespread fears that so-called echo chambers and filter bubbles are leading to political polarization that poses a danger to democracy. But are the fears unfounded? (Melvin Sokolsky/1963 via Creative Commons)

The myth of the echo chamber

Despite fears that so-called echo chambers are causing political polarization, a new study suggests it's not the case.
A Malawi boy sits among drying tobacco leaves in 2014. Jeffrey Drope

Big Tobacco woos African farmers with bogus promises of prosperity

The tobacco industry claims that tobacco- growing is essential to the livelihoods of millions of small-scale rural farmers in Malawi, Zambia and Kenya. Research shows that's untrue.
More than 70% of Rwanda’s population are subsistence farmers. Shutterstock/Sarine Arslanian

Rwanda’s agricultural revolution is not the success it claims to be

Findings from several scientific studies show the real impact of Rwanda's agricultural policies and the challenges it faces.
There is no research evidence that spanking improves child behaviour. On the contrary, spanking is associated with aggression, antisocial behaviour, mental health problems and negative relationships with parents.

Why parents should never spank children

The debate on spanking is over. Scientific studies consistently show that it is harmful to children, increasing the likelihood of mental health problems and antisocial behaviours.
Trade and investment agreements can increase consumption of unhealthy foods, sugary drinks and tobacco – leading to soaring rates of obesity and chronic diseases globally. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

The hidden connection between obesity, heart disease and trade

As government representatives meet at the WHO global conference on noncommunicable diseases in Uruguay this week, their focus should be on reducing the health impacts of trade deals.
Marine waters are an important source of food for Inuit. (Judith Slein/Flickr)

Latest rocket launch renews concerns over Inuit food security

The North Water Polynya, or Pikialasorsuaq, is a key ocean area for Arctic animals and for Inuit hunting and fishing. Rocket launches threaten to contaminate the area with harmful chemicals.
In an ideal world of gender equality and recognition for women’s work, surrogacy could perhaps be part of a paid, legitimate economy. (Camila Cordeiro on Unsplash)

When women are surrogate mothers: Is that work?

As the Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society urges the government to consider "compensation" for surrogacy, we need to talk about the implications of this rhetoric for women.
Done well, translational science can save lives. (Flickr/kaibara87)

New tools promise life-saving treatments from basic science

Systematic reviews are rarely applied to basic research. A new study shows how they could separate good data from bad, saving millions in research dollars and speeding life-saving treatments.
Did the TPP die - or is it now a zombie? (Visual Hunt/Killaee)

Zombie Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement lurches on

NAFTA renegotiations may see provisions from the Trans-Pacific Partnership revive like zombies. We must remember their failures - on income inequality, labour and environmental protection.
Sweat creates evaporative cooling for your body, with the amount required determined by your size and shape, not your gender. from www.shutterstock.com

Health Check: do men really sweat more than women?

They say 'men sweat, while women glow'. But new research shows gender is not the reason for different levels of sweating.
Tensions between cattle herders and crop-farming communities in Nigeria have escalated in the past few months. Reuters/Akintunde Akinleye

Nigeria faces new security threat fuelled by climate change and ethnicity

Escalating clashes between herders and farmers in Nigeria threaten the country's national and food security. A response based on innovation, sustainability and political will is urgently needed.
Increasing emissions from Canada’s oil and gas sector will make Canada’s post-2020 pledge very difficult to achieve. kris krüg/Flickr

Canada’s climate target is a smokescreen and full of loopholes

This month Canada revealed its post-2020 climate target as 30% below 2005 levels by 2030. But current policies make it unlikely Canada will achieve the target within the country.
More palatable in a capsule - but do they do any good? Flickr - Jo Christian Oterhals

Fish oil or snake oil? Most capsules don’t contain what they promise

My mum and dad are troopers. Every morning, in an effort to stave off old age and dry rot, they down a tablespoon of oily, stinky fish oil. This is done without any obvious signs of distress – clearly…
Overcoming gaps in medical funding. nakrnsm

Trials funded by rich patients could help find cures for us all

Disease can affect any person, rich or poor. While your bank balance can’t really protect you from getting sick, it could potentially buy you – and many other patients – access to a better treatment for…

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