Queen's University Belfast

Queen’s University Belfast is a member of the Russell Group of 24 leading UK research-intensive universities, providing world-class education underpinned by world-class research.

Founded as Queen’s College in 1845, it became a university in its own right in 1908. Today, it is an international centre of research and education rooted at the heart of Northern Ireland.

The University has won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education on five occasions – for Northern Ireland’s Comprehensive Cancer Services programme and for world-class achievement in green chemistry, environmental research, palaeoecology and law.

Four prestigious Times Higher Education (THE) Awards further recognises the University’s contribution to society. Queen’s received the award for Excellence and Innovation in the Arts in 2008, was awarded the title of the UK’s Entrepreneurial University of the Year in 2009, won the Outstanding Engineering Research Team of the Year category in 2010 and received the Most Innovative Teacher of the Year Award in 2011.

With more than 17,000 students and 3,500 staff, it is a dynamic and diverse institution, a magnet for inward investment, a patron of the arts and a global player in areas ranging from cancer studies to sustainability, and from pharmaceuticals to creative writing.

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Displaying 261 - 279 of 279 articles

Joyce is remembered in many ways, but not often as a singer. nerosunero

This Bloomsday, remember Joyce as a traditional Irish singer

Bloomsday has come around again, the day (June 16) in 1904 on which all the events of James Joyce’s great novel Ulysses unfold. 1904 was an auspicious year for Joyce. It may surprise some people to know…
Iraqis fleeing from Mosul after ISIS took control. EPA/Kamal Akrayi

Explainer: what is ISIS and where did it come from?

Iraq is facing its most alarming crisis in years. The second city of Mosul and the major city of Tikrit have been seized by a violent jihadist group, ISIS – the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, formerly…
Qatari football fans celebrate … but for how much longer? Manaf Kamil

FIFA lawyers would find it hard to strip Qatar of the World Cup

Reports in the Sunday Times that improper secretive payments of millions of pounds were allegedly made to officials supporting Qatar’s bid for the 2022 World Cup have led to calls for the Gulf state to…
One pupil posted online that a teacher’s skin was ‘covered in potholes’. Dave Thompson/PA

Cyberbullying by parents and pupils takes toll on teachers

A new survey by the teachers union NASUWT has provided further evidence to confirm that teachers too, as well as pupils, can be targets of online bullying. In the research, just more than a fifth of the…
We need to break beyond operatic exclamations. Wikimedia Commons

The problem with arts advocacy is the people in power

“Wouldn’t you just die without Mahler?” This classic line from Willy Russell’s Educating Rita, spoken by the broken aesthete Trish, signifies both main character Rita’s entry into the realms of cultured…
Correcting Eire: the Irish state is serious about modernising. William Murphy/Flickr

Ireland’s post-crash reforms promise more than just recovery

The Republic of Ireland’s calamitous recent years of financial crisis and government dysfunction look to be coming to an end, with an economic recovery gathering pace and a new administration that seems…
Black economy: regulating sex work is easier said than done. Ian Britton

The Scarlet Isle: the politics of male sex work in Ireland

Both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland are taking steps towards new regulations for the sex work industry, principally aimed at better protecting victims of coercion and trafficking. However…
Football’s popularity in Asia has fuelled illegal betting. Eugene Hoshiko/AP

FA is fixing football, but not how you might think

In the run up to the London Olympics, Jacques Rogge, then president of the International Olympic Committee, made a surprising statement. Doping, he said, was no longer the number one threat to the integrity…
Lower house rules. AnCatDubh

Irish senate gets its day of reckoning

A moment of truth has arrived for Seanad Éireann, the upper house of the Irish Parliament. The proposed amendment to the Constitution of Ireland seeks to abolish the indirectly elected, 60-member chamber…
Parliament in the early 1800s: good at resolving banking crises.

Response to past crises shames post-Lehman dithering

The fifth anniversary of Lehman Brothers’ demise is an opportune moment to take stock and contextualise what has happened since. And one good way to do so is to compare this government’s policy response…
Blue sky thinking in St Petersburg. victorgrigas

Powerful and plural G20 is worth listening to

The G20 Summit brings together in St Petersburg, Russia a remarkably diverse and powerful collection of states. It is a unique experiment in global governance, signalling the end of dominance by a few…
On the hunt for rogue internet cafes. Niall Carson/PA

Is it really worth bugging? A guide to the G8

So what’s so special about this lot? Who decides which countries get to be in the gang? Can you get kicked out? How does it stack up against the G20? If spies were to listen in, would they hear anything…
Welcome to Northern Ireland. Julien Behal/PA

G8 leaders could use some local knowledge

Global leaders will discuss tax, trade, and other international issues at the G8 summit next week in county Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. If they want to achieve anything, they must recognise that economics…

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