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Strategic Partner RMIT University

RMIT is a global university of technology and design. Founded in 1887, it is now the nation’s largest tertiary institution, with 82,000 students. RMIT has three Melbourne campuses, two campuses in Vietnam and a centre in Barcelona, Spain, and significant partnerships in Hong Kong, mainland China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. RMIT is a leader in technology, design, global business, communication, global communities, health solutions and urban sustainable futures, and is ranked in the top 100 for engineering and technology in the 2010 QS World University Rankings.

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The Productivity Commission has attempted to move beyond the WorkChoices rhetoric. AAP/Tracey Nearmy

Workplace inquiry attempts to move beyond WorkChoices

The release of the Productivity Commission’s five issues papers on Australia’s workplace relations framework has already fanned inevitable claims from the federal opposition and unions that it will pave…
Like Bill Murray’s character in Groundhog Day, Australia must change its way of thinking – or else we face the grim fate of being trapped in an economic rut. Columbia Pictures

Prosperity or decline? Liberating ideas can reboot our economy

The World Economic Forum’s annual meeting wraps up off the piste in the Swiss ski resort this weekend. Two themes are growth and stability; and innovation and industry. Attendees must feel like Bill Murray…
DJ Nina Las Vegas of Triple J, a station taking risks that benefit others. AAP/City of Sydney

Triple J is a rare beast, an exemplar for economic policy

It’s a common refrain among the “drys” in any government that arts and cultural policy should set its course by the lights of economic policy, usually competition, growth, and innovation policy. Sometimes…
Vocational education is underfunded, understood by too few, and too specific to allow students to go on to further education. Shutterstock

Vocational training is too complex, too job-specific, too underfunded

The Australian government is reviewing vocational education and training qualifications. The aim is to streamline a system that has educators, employers and government baffled by its complexity. The government…
Motorists in the United States and elsewhere have been treated to low prices. Whether they will bounce back is another question. EPA/CJ Gunther/AAP

Energy firms are waging a price war they might be unable to win

Late in 2014, we saw iron ore and coal prices fall. Now we are seeing oil prices tumble, dipping to less than US$50 a barrel, half the price of a year ago. In all cases, these price collapses reflect the…
It is estimated that 73,000 people died within seconds in Nagasaki, the second Japanese city to fall victim to the atomic bomb. AAP/Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum

The nuclear threat: reflections on the atomic age

With the end of the Cold War, the nuclear arms race came to a virtual halt, but the nuclear threat remained. In regional rivalries, such as those in the south Asia subcontinent, northeast Asia, and the…
A debate about penalty rates ought to involve the cash economy. Image sourced from www.shutterstock.com

Penalty rates and their role in Australia’s cash economy

Amid the ongoing debate over the future of penalty rates, a subtle but important issue also deserves to be examined: their impact on Australia’s “cash economy”. The Fair Work Commission is currently reviewing…
Only a community development approach can truly result in ‘build back better’ when it comes to responding to natural disasters such as the Boxing Day tsunami. EPA/Peter Endig

Boxing Day tsunami: balancing social and physical recovery

There have been many natural disasters since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, but none have exceeded it in the combination of scale and scope of its destructive impacts. The scale of devastation for coastal…
The Climate Change Authority has recommended giving Australia more time to hit its renewable energy target. AAP Image/Angela Harper

Climate Change Authority calls for delayed renewables deadline

The Climate Change Authority has recommended that the government move back the deadline for the large-scale Renewable Energy Target by three years, from 2020 to 2023, rather than risk jeopardising investment…
A ballerina is painted on the back of the Theatre Royal in Christchurch by Tauranga artist Owen Dippie and his team. Jocelyn Kinghorn

Putting culture at the core of the Christchurch rebuild

Three recent events in the New Zealand city of Christchurch, almost four years on from the magnitude 6.3 earthquake in February 2011, suggest that arts and culture are playing a central role in the recovery…
Christopher Pyne says our universities need reform, but that doesn’t mean his ‘plan A’ is the only option. AAP

University funding reform blocked? There’s a pretty obvious ‘Plan B’

The Senate has rejected the Coalition’s plans to deregulate university fees, cut university funding by 20% and extend government subsidies to private providers, despite a few modest measures offered at…
Taking the politics out of it, what should the ABC be doing with its reduced budget? AAP/Joel Carrett

Expert panel: is there a place for the ABC in modern Australia?

In the recent ABC funding debate, many have questioned what the public broadcaster is for. What should its role be in Australia’s contemporary media landscape? Some argue that the ABC is a market-failure…
GPS is used in many devices to help us navigate. Flickr/daveynin

Predicting daily space weather will help keep your GPS on target

It’s well known that severe space weather events – which are quite rare – can have a negative impact on our use of Global Positioning System (GPS) enabled devices. But our research, published in Geophysical…
Is it economics that’s the issue with ABC cuts – and if so, what kind of economics? ABC Publicity

The economics of politics is what’s firing anger over the ABC cuts

Sometimes things that are pretty simple for most people can seriously confuse an economist. The heat over the ABC cuts is a good example of the blurry line between economics – and the economics of politics…
Gaultier’s clothes adopt elements of satire, visual puns and the ridiculous to critique what we wear. NGV, Brooke Holm

Jean Paul Gaultier: how to make (or bake) a blockbuster

French fashion designer Jean Paul Gaultier – whose designs are featured at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) until February 2015 – has always had an unsettling relationship with museum fashion exhibitions…
Was the Coalition too quick to take up Gerard Henderson’s IR club theme? Dan Himbrechts/AAP

The enduring myth of the industrial relations club

The Abbott government will soon ask the Productivity Commission to review the Fair Work system. In parallel with that review, we need a more sophisticated debate about our workplace relations framework…

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