RMIT University

RMIT is a global university of technology and design. Founded in 1887, it is now the nation’s largest tertiary institution, with 82,000 students. RMIT has three Melbourne campuses, two campuses in Vietnam and a centre in Barcelona, Spain, and significant partnerships in Hong Kong, mainland China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. RMIT is a leader in technology, design, global business, communication, global communities, health solutions and urban sustainable futures, and is ranked in the top 100 for engineering and technology in the 2010 QS World University Rankings.

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Waiting for my lunch 2014. What happens when we start noticing the white noise of ‘non places’? Julie Shiels

Waiting: rediscovering boredom in the age of the smartphone

We constantly use electronic devices to distract ourselves from the tedium associated with waiting. Yet being bored can be a creative activity.
An outstanding example of sustainable residential building, Breathe Architecture’s The Commons apartments in Melbourne won a 2014 National Architecture Award. Image courtesy of Australian Institute of Architects

Sustainable cities? Australia’s building and planning rules stand in the way of getting there

New South Wales is the only state that has made meaningful progress on legislation and enforcement of standards capable of creating a sustainable built environment.
Lake Liddell with power stations. Wikimedia commons

More coal doesn’t equal more peak power

We need to remember that baseload coal power stations won't help cope with peak demand – the issue that will determine whether people in elevators are trapped by a sudden blackout, per Barnaby Joyce.
The Beastie Boys in the music video for Sure Shot. Screenshot from Youtube

My favourite album: The Beastie Boys’ Ill Communication

The Beastie Boys' Ill Communication closed out hip-hop's Golden Age with a kaleidoscope of jazz-infused beats, bratty punk interludes and a deeper appreciation for storytelling.
The Virgin Mary may not be able to pull Brazil out of a deep recession, but her church-sponsored house calls do wonders to ease economic malaise among participating Catholic families. Pilar Olivares/Reuters

This old Catholic ritual is giving Brazil’s economy a small boost, one Virgin Mary statuette at a time

For a century, Brazil's Catholic Church has sent holy statues out to parishioners' homes. A new study finds that these visits create a local subeconomy, benefitting families and the church.
A huge solar flare flashes in the middle of the sun on Sept. 6, 2017. A separate image of the Earth provides scale. NASA/GSFC/SDO

Massive sunspots and huge solar flares mean unexpected space weather for Earth

At a time in the sun's cycle when space weather experts expect less solar activity, our star is going bonkers with solar flares and coronal mass ejections. What effects will Earth feel?
Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Minister for the Environment and Energy Josh Frydenberg speak with the media during a press conference following a meeting with energy company bosses at the Commonwealth Parliamentary Offices in Sydney. AAP Image/Dean Lewins

Turnbull is pursuing ‘energy certainty’ but what does that actually mean?

Energy certainty is unattainable, because of disruptive change and multiple agendas. But we can deliver affordable, reliable, clean energy services. Governments will have to adapt.
Rail investments have brought Ballarat, Geelong and other regional centres closer in travel time to Melbourne than many outer suburbs. Tony & Wayne/flickr

This is how regional rail can help ease our big cities’ commuter crush

Victoria offers lessons in the benefits of integrating metropolitan and regional planning, using regional rail to shrink distance and ease the pressures of growth on our big capital cities.
Under the proposal, irrigators would have to submit a statement that tallies with aerial images of their water use. AAP Image/Cubbie Group

‘Tax returns for water’: satellite-audited statements can save the Murray-Darling

Allegations of water theft have thrown the Murray-Darling Basin Plan into crisis. The solution could involve users declaring their annual water use, subject to random audits - like a tax return.

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