RMIT University

RMIT is a global university of technology and design. Founded in 1887, it is now the nation’s largest tertiary institution, with 82,000 students. RMIT has three Melbourne campuses, two campuses in Vietnam and a centre in Barcelona, Spain, and significant partnerships in Hong Kong, mainland China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. RMIT is a leader in technology, design, global business, communication, global communities, health solutions and urban sustainable futures, and is ranked in the top 100 for engineering and technology in the 2010 QS World University Rankings.

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Nne-star-rated ‘Catalyst’ houses built to maximise passive solar principles were evaluated against seven control houses built to DHHS standards. Trivess Moore

Sustainable housing’s expensive, right? Not when you look at the whole equation

Emerging research challenges the idea that sustainable housing is unaffordable. It shows sustainability and good design can be affordable when analyses include social, health and wellbeing benefits.
Mark Mangini (left) and David White hold this year’s Oscar for Sound Editing for Mad Max: Fury Road. Paul Buck/EPA

The price of victory: comparing the cost of Olympic gold to an elite arts prize

Amid the hand-wringing about the price of an Olympic medal, our experts crunched the numbers on the cost of success in the arts. And at A$8 million per international award, it turns out that elite culture is a lot better value than sport.
Tracking what you stop to pay attention to and what you ‘don’t see’ can tell us a lot about what might be going on inside your mind.

The Panopticons are coming! And they’ll know when we think the grass is greener

Eye-tracking technology helps us understand how people interact with their environment. This can improve policy and design, but can also be a tool for surveillance and control.
Under the NDIS there are risks for the carers people with a disability employ. Dave Hunt/AAP

New risks for disability care workers under the NDIS

The roll out of the NDIS means disability service providers and the people they employ are exposed to more market forces and this could result in protection for workers.
Studies show that award winning books do not represent expert consensus about quality. Shutterstock

Why we need more book awards

Arts and culture are part of the broad subset of economic activities that are afforded special treatment – usually within the ambit of a government ministry – by some claim to special circumstances or…
Adaptations are a learned skill – can Australian cinema do it successfully? The Dressmaker/Universal Pictures

Do film adaptations boost Australian movies at the box office?

With the success of films like The Dressmaker, book adaptations are giving a much needed boost to the Australian box office. So why are there so few? And why isn't adaption a compulsory part of screen studies?
Without electrons there would be no electron microscopes, and therefore no close-ups like this image of pollen. Heiti Paves/Wikimedia Commons

Small world: does ecology reach all the way down to the subatomic scale?

The advent of electron microscopy and nanobiology has moved our appreciation of the living world to unprecedentedly small scales – with entirely new benefits and potential pitfalls to consider.
Urban planning was once an Olympic event, although the first gold medal – awarded to Germany’s Alfred Hensel for the Nuremberg stadium – turned out to be an unfortunate choice.

‘No More Hunger’ Games: if only we cared about the real-world Liveability Olympics

Imagine cities competed to eliminate hunger, poverty, unemployment, crime and greenhouse emissions, and to offer housing and transport for all. Don't scoff – urban planning was once an Olympic event.
The Papunya elders who organised the event were less concerned about their team winning and more about ensuring each community got a fair go. Barry Judd

The Aboriginal football ethic: where the rules get flexible

Sports weekends are where family connections are sustained, and culture is infused into Australian football games played on country.
Connecting the city and regions, long-distance commuting is a significant factor in regional centres. Peter Mackey/flickr

Commuters help regions tap into city-driven growth

Long-distance commuting may help promote the development of regional cities by boosting local populations, skills and incomes.

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