The University of Queensland

The University of Queensland, established in 1910, is the largest university in Queensland. UQ is a pace-setter in discovery and translational research, and is committed to teaching excellence and outstanding mentorship that leads to well-rounded graduates who are equipped to live and work effectively in a global environment.

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There are more important things than winning an argument – like making everyone feel valued. www.shutterstock.com

How to make good arguments at school (and everywhere else)

Whether it's a school debate or just a conversation in every day life, here are three principles to keep in mind when having an argument.
Pacific leaders don’t want to talk about China’s rising influence – they want Scott Morrison to make a firm commitment to cut Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions. Mick Tsikas/AAP

Can Scott Morrison deliver on climate change in Tuvalu – or is his Pacific ‘step up’ doomed?

It's becoming increasingly obvious that Australia's inability – or refusal – to take firmer action on climate change is undermining its entire 'Pacific step-up'.
Fortitude Valley is unique in Australia for its concentration of live music venues, like The Valley Drive In, in one small neighbourhood. The Valley Drive In/Facebook

Tighter alcohol licensing hasn’t killed live music, but it’s harder for emerging artists

The good news is that the growth of live music continued under Queensland's liquor licensing reforms. The bad news is that venues rely on late-night alcohol sales to cover costs.
For young women in Queensland, the risk of unwanted sexual attention is high when they go out at night. vchalShutterstock

Unwanted sexual attention plagues young women going out at night

Rates of unwelcome advances haven't changed under Queensland's 'Tackling Alcohol-Fuelled Violence' policies. In one entertainment district, it happened to 26% of women the night they were interviewed.
Siena Stubbs, 17, from Yirrkala in East Arnhem Shire reads the Imagination Declaration on behalf of a group of Indigenous and non-Indigenous students at the 2019 Garma Festival. AIME

The Imagination Declaration: young Indigenous Australians want to be heard – but will we listen?

A group of school students have just shown what real leadership looks like on Indigenous issues – and you'll hear more about their ideas in coming months at your local school, childcare centre or uni.
Insurers have to protect themselves against foreseeable risks. For insurers of fossil fuel projects, those risks are growing. Shutterstock

Adani beware: coal is on the road to becoming completely uninsurable

The decision of Suncorp to dump coal, just months after the re-election of the Morrison government, makes it clear that insurers can't afford wishful thinking.
Queenslanders are drinking heavily when they go out and breathalyser tests show most don’t realise how drunk they are.

Queenslanders are among our heaviest drinkers on nights out, and changing that culture is a challenge

Even after 'Tackling Alcohol-Fuelled Violence' policies took effect in 2016, Queenslanders still drink more heavily on nights out. Reported levels of aggression are higher than in other states too.
Public alarm at alcohol-related violence led the Queensland government to change liquor licensing laws in 2016. The results of a two-year evaluation are now in. Qld Police/AAP

Lessons from Queensland on alcohol, violence and the night-time economy

A comprehensive two-year evaluation of statewide measures introduced in 2016 has shown it's possible to reduce alcohol-related violence while also producing economic benefits.
The burial of some of the Japanese prisoners of war who lost their lives in the mass outbreak from B Camp, (the Japanese section), at No. 12 Prisoner Of War compound in the early hours of August 5, 1944. Australian War Memorial (073487)

The Cowra breakout: remembering and reflecting on Australia’s biggest prison escape 75 years on

It's one of the largest prison escapes in world history and it's through fiction we can understand the tragedy, from both an Australian and Japanese perspective.
Hong Kong protesters have exploited the public space of the city’s streets as well as digital space. Ritchie B. Tongo/EPA

How Hong Kong protesters have been winning the battle for public space

Hong Kong has few recognisable public places and none with the space for huge numbers of protesters. Instead, they have co-opted the streets and digital media as public spaces for protest.
Another reason you don’t want to get too close to a black hole is because of something we call ‘spaghettification’. If this happened to Earth it would be… unpleasant. Shutterstock

Curious Kids: can Earth be affected by a black hole in the future?

If you got too close to a black hole, it would suck you in and you'd never be able to escape, even if you were travelling at the speed of light. This point of no return is called the event horizon.

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