The University of Queensland

The University of Queensland, established in 1910, is the largest university in Queensland. UQ is a pace-setter in discovery and translational research, and is committed to teaching excellence and outstanding mentorship that leads to well-rounded graduates who are equipped to live and work effectively in a global environment.

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Domestic killings have long been treated as somehow less serious than when random strangers are killed. Shutterstock

Man who burnt his wife alive gets at least 27 years’ jail, but not life – as victim was no stranger

The Crown said this case was an example of the worst type of murder, but the judge disagreed, arguing the killer, when freed, would be less of a threat to the wider community than some other killers.
Same-sex marriage has been legal for a year in Australia, but more progress can still be made on gender inequality in marriages and cohabiting relationships. Jono Searle/AAP

Marriage has changed dramatically throughout history, but gender inequalities remain

Marriage equality was a major step forward for Australia. But women in both marriages and cohabiting relationships continue to deal with inequality and gender-prescribed roles.
The mosquitoes that spread Japanese encephalitis are usually found in wetlands and drainage ditches, and will be out biting mostly at dawn and dusk. Bryon Lippincott/Flikr

What is Japanese encephalitis virus and how can I avoid it when I travel?

Japanese encephalitis virus is rare and doesn't usually cause symptoms. But in a small proportion of cases it can result in long-term neurological impairment and death.
Montañas de Alaska, EE UU, uno de los países con más espacios naturales vírgenes. Unsplash / Chad Peltola

Rusia, Canadá, Australia, EE UU y Brasil: el futuro del 70% de los espacios vírgenes del planeta depende de ellos

Más de dos tercios de las áreas vírgenes que quedan en el planeta están en manos de sólo cinco países, según un nuevo mapa mundial. En necesario un esfuerzo de conservación unánime para salvar los últimos espacios salvajes de la Tierra.
They’re a long way from the traditional inner-city ‘Chinatowns’, but the suburbs are where you’ll find 21st-century China-born migrants settling. Jandrie Lombard/Shutterstock

Where are Chinese migrants choosing to settle in Australia? Look to the suburbs

China-born migrants in Australia's capital cities are becoming more suburban, but there are differences in settlement patterns between the biggest cities and smaller cities.
The sense of smell helps us know what and where things are, like yummy food. R. Suarez.

Curious Kids: How do we smell?

The parts of the brain that get 'smell signals' from the nose also do other things, such as storing memories or provoking emotions. That is why some smells can bring back old memories.
Children grow up to look somewhat like their parents. Flickr/d26b73

Curious Kids: Why do people grow to certain sizes?

Every human carries an instruction booklet with a very special code, called DNA. Our eyes cannot read the code, but our bodies can. The code tells our body what to do and how to look.
Brazil, home to the Amazon, is one of just five ‘mega-wilderness’ countries. CIFOR

Earth’s wilderness is vanishing, and just a handful of nations can save it

More than two-thirds of Earth's remaining wilderness is in the hands of just five countries, according to a new global map. A concerted conservation effort is needed to save our last wild places.
What is in these products? And if additives don’t affect your health, would you care? Shutterstock

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: Food fraud, the centuries-old problem that won’t go away

Food fraud, the centuries-old problem that won’t go away. The Conversation55.8 MB (download)
Dairy farmers used to put sheep brains and chalk in skim milk to make it look frothier and whiter. Coffee, honey and wine have also been past targets of food fraudsters. Can the law ever keep up?
The good thing about space is that – even though it has lots of dangerous stuff floating in it, and lots of exploding stars – it’s so big and empty that it almost doesn’t matter. NASA/CXC/U.Texas

Curious Kids: If a star explodes, will it destroy Earth?

Are there stars other than the Sun that might explode soon close to us? Yes, there are! As long as by 'soon' we mean within a million years.
Safety standards for children’s products aren’t intended to completely prevent injury. from shutterstock.com

Ensuring children get enough physical activity while being safe is a delicate balancing act

Only a minority of products in Australia actually have mandatory standards applied to them. There is a misconception that product standards can prevent all injuries.

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