Founding Partner University of Melbourne

The University of Melbourne is an internationally recognised, research-intensive university with a strong tradition of excellence in teaching, research and community engagement spanning more than 160 years.

Its outstanding performance in international rankings puts the University of Melbourne at the forefront of higher education globally. It is ranked number 1 in Australia by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings and 28th worldwide. Melbourne’s position as Australia’s top University has also been reaffirmed in the 2013 Shanghai Jiao Tong rankings, in which it has moved up three places from last year, to equal 54th in the world and third in the Asia-Pacific.

The University is uniquely located on the fringe of the city of Melbourne’s central business district. It serves as a hub for the Parkville research precinct – one of the world’s leading centres of medical and biotechnological research – and is a vital part of surrounding neighbourhoods such as cosmopolitan Carlton.

About 50,000 of the best and brightest students from around the globe come to study at the University of Melbourne.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 2726 articles

Regional leaders must continue to take concrete steps to avoid a repeat of the 2015 Andaman Sea refugee crisis. Reuters/Soe Zeya Tun

The Andaman Sea refugee crisis a year on: what happened and how did the region respond?

The region is showing signs it is determined to ensure similar mass displacement crises such as that which took place in the Andaman Sea in 2015 are avoided.
Was Labor’s shadow environment minister, Mark Butler, right to say Australia was ‘pretty much’ the only major advanced economies where greenhouse pollution levels are going up? AAP/Stefan Postles

Election FactCheck: is Australia among the only major advanced economies where pollution levels are going up?

Labor's shadow environment minister, Mark Butler, said Australia is now "pretty much the only major advanced economy where pollution levels are going up, not coming down." Is that right?
Big Blue Lavender Bay, one of the three paintings at the centre of trial. AAP Image/Genevieve Gannon

Is your artwork genuine and who can you trust to advise you?

The conviction of two men in relation to the sale of forged Brett Whiteley paintings indicates that Australia needs to get its act together when it comes to authenticating artworks.
Opponents of projects are often scorned as NIMBYs, but active citizenship and local consultation are key elements in creating a city that works well for as many people as possible. Teresa Parker/AAP

30-minute city’? Not in my backyard! Smart Cities Plan must let people have their say

Cities are home to many different people who will not always agree. We need to learn to embrace public debate as an ongoing, constructive process for working through diverse views and values.
Should it be the government or the states that decide how money is spent in schools? from shutterstock.com

What is the Coalition’s real agenda for Australian schools?

Mixed messages from the Coalition government around schools policy are not only confusing, but also raise deeper questions about whether they have a firm position on schooling at all.
Streetlife density in Florence – urban buzz or overcrowding? Kim Dovey

Urban density matters – but what does it mean?

One person's high density may be another's sprawl; the same tall building may be experienced as oppressive or exhilarating; a "good crowd" for one can be "overcrowded" for another.
Although the Coalition is largely associated with this issue, Labor first introduced the Medicare rebate freeze in 2013 as a ‘temporary’ measure. AAP/Joel Carrett

Confused about the Medicare rebate freeze? Here’s what you need to know

Labor will lift the rebate freeze from 2017, while under the Coalition, GPs will be paid the same amount for delivering health services in 2020 as they were in 2014. So what does this mean for patients?
For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, constitutional change is about righting injustices inherent in the current recognition of difference, rather than promoting an agenda of sameness. Michael Coghlan/Flickr

On the wrong track: why Australia’s attempt at Indigenous reconciliation will fail

The process of constitutional recognition was initially to be completed by 2013, but is now being directed towards a referendum in May 2017 to mark the 50th anniversary of the 1967 referendum.
Success will come from changing the way Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s issues are talked about and addressed – from one of deficit in which people are described as problematic to one of empowerment and strength. Global Panorama/Flickr

Indigenous reconciliation in Australia: still a bridge too far?

In many ways, the "great Australian silence" about Indigenous history, pointed out by eminent anthropologist W.E.H. Stanner back in 1968, still endures in this country some 50 years later.

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