University of Melbourne

The University of Melbourne is an internationally recognised, research-intensive university with a strong tradition of excellence in teaching, research and community engagement spanning more than 160 years.

Its outstanding performance in international rankings puts the University of Melbourne at the forefront of higher education globally. It is ranked number 1 in Australia by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings and 28th worldwide. Melbourne’s position as Australia’s top University has also been reaffirmed in the 2013 Shanghai Jiao Tong rankings, in which it has moved up three places from last year, to equal 54th in the world and third in the Asia-Pacific.

The University is uniquely located on the fringe of the city of Melbourne’s central business district. It serves as a hub for the Parkville research precinct – one of the world’s leading centres of medical and biotechnological research – and is a vital part of surrounding neighbourhoods such as cosmopolitan Carlton.

About 50,000 of the best and brightest students from around the globe come to study at the University of Melbourne.

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Displaying 21 - 40 of 3758 articles

Picture painted by a primary school child in Sri Lanka after the tsunami in 2005. UNESCO World Heritage Centre

Children aren’t liabilities in disasters – they can help, if we let them

It's understandable to want to shield children from the impacts of disasters. But research suggests that they should be given a voice in disaster planning and a role in reducing the risks.
The British First Fleet knew little of conditions in Port Jackson, later Sydney Cove, before their arrival. George Edwards Peacock, State Library of New South Wales.

Black skies and raging seas: how the First Fleet got a first taste of Australia’s unforgiving climate

When the First Fleet sailed into Sydney Cove in 1788, they entered an ancient and unforgiving landscape. A new book charts Australians' relationship with one of the world's most volatile climates.
Current MDMA trials could lead to the drug moving from the fringes of mainstream psychiatry to being recognised as a mainstream treatment option. AAP

Is psychiatry ready for medical MDMA?

Current trials suggest MDMA could used to treat psychiatric disorders as a prescription medicine by 2021. But there remain a number of unresolved patient / doctor issues to be considered.
We found the prevalence of ageism among younger people is most apparent when participants were asked about succession statements like whether older people should actively make way for the young. www.shutterstock.com

Men and young people more likely to be ageist: study

Men and young people are more likely to be ageist, but few Australians are resolutely ageist in their views, a new survey finds.
Sharing experiences of #MeToo can open the flood gates for online abuse and physical threats. from www.shutterstock.com

#MeToo must also tackle online abuse

Today's workplaces extend beyond physical spaces, so movements like #metoo must trigger change in how we behave online.
Some people thought Charles Darwin was suggesting that, over a very long period of time, apes turned into people. He was not. Flickr/Ronald Woan

Curious Kids: Can chimpanzees turn into people?

The short answer is no. An individual of one species cannot, during its lifetime, turn into another species. But your question helps us think about life, evolution and what it means to be human.
Victorians who opposed the East West Link before the November 2014 election would have felt not much had changed when the new government announced the West Gate Tunnel in March 2015. Courtney Biggs/AAP

Sidelining citizens when deciding on transport projects is asking for trouble

Transport infrastructure has such an impact on what kind of city we become that more democratic planning is long overdue. But public consultation is typically limited and focused on design issues.

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