University of Melbourne

The University of Melbourne is an internationally recognised, research-intensive university with a strong tradition of excellence in teaching, research and community engagement spanning more than 160 years.

Its outstanding performance in international rankings puts the University of Melbourne at the forefront of higher education globally. It is ranked number 1 in Australia by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings and 28th worldwide. Melbourne’s position as Australia’s top University has also been reaffirmed in the 2013 Shanghai Jiao Tong rankings, in which it has moved up three places from last year, to equal 54th in the world and third in the Asia-Pacific.

The University is uniquely located on the fringe of the city of Melbourne’s central business district. It serves as a hub for the Parkville research precinct – one of the world’s leading centres of medical and biotechnological research – and is a vital part of surrounding neighbourhoods such as cosmopolitan Carlton.

About 50,000 of the best and brightest students from around the globe come to study at the University of Melbourne.

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Displaying 21 - 40 of 3604 articles

A scene from Bangarra Dance Theatre’s Lore: the oldest continuing culture in the world resonates with overseas audiences. Jeff Tan/Newzulu

‘Australia has no culture’: changing the mindset of the cringe

Why do students still describe Australia as a 'young' country lacking culture? Are our universities doing enough to to teach Australian films, artwork and books?
A fireman tackles one of the wildfires that swept through parts of California in October. Jim Urquhart/Reuters

2017 is set to be among the three hottest years on record

This year is poised to go down as the hottest non-El Niño year ever recorded, with record low polar ice and extreme weather that left many regions battling bushfires and hurricanes.

Mr. Mercedes, Masturbation and Madness

2017 has been a pretty excellent year for TV adaptations of books. Without pause, I’d enthusiastically recommend a Summertime binge on Strike, I Love Dick, Big Little Lies (which I wrote about here), The…
A supplied image obtained Tuesday, October 31, 2017 of asylum seekers refusing to leave the Manus Island Detention Centre. AAP

The ethics of medical practice in offshore detention facilities

Health professionals often have to navigate an ethical minefield working in offshore detention facilities. The current crisis in Manus island provides a case in point.
International students brought an estimated A$28bn to our economy in 2016-17. Shutterstock

We need to make sure the international student boom is sustainable

Australia is currently experiencing one of the largest booms in international student enrolments, which needs to be sustainable if we're going to continue to benefit economically.
It’s now possible to experience virtual walks through nature – like this video, for example – but can that ever match the real thing? Video screenshot, sounds from the core/YouTube

Can virtual nature and poo transplants solve city dwellers’ health problems?

Faecal transplants and virtual nature are technological solutions to ‘nature deficit disorder’ from urban living. Such 'quick fixes' offer some benefits, but are no substitute for the real thing.
A man protesting against the government’s new power to ban organisations deemed anti-Pancasila, Indonesia’s state ideology. Reuters/Beawiharta

Indonesia takes an ultra-nationalist turn against Islamic populism

A recently passed regulation in lieu of law allows the government to ban organisations deemed against Indonesia's state ideology Pancasila. It marks a troubling turn towards ultra-nationalism.
Lots of parking: the extraordinary amount of valuable land used to park cars in most cities could soon be freed up for other uses. Antonio Gravante/Shutterstock

Freeing up the huge areas set aside for parking can transform our cities

Cities around the world are starting to rethink the vast areas of land set aside for parking. The convergence of several trends likely will mean this space becomes available for other uses.
Extreme temperatures in Cordoba, Spain in June 2017. EPA/SALAS

Why hot weather records continue to tumble worldwide

In an unchanging climate, we would expect record-breaking temperatures to get rarer as the observation record grows longer. But in the real world the opposite is true - because we are driving up temperatures.

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