University of Melbourne

The University of Melbourne is an internationally recognised, research-intensive university with a strong tradition of excellence in teaching, research and community engagement spanning more than 160 years.

Its outstanding performance in international rankings puts the University of Melbourne at the forefront of higher education globally. It is ranked number 1 in Australia by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings and 28th worldwide. Melbourne’s position as Australia’s top University has also been reaffirmed in the 2013 Shanghai Jiao Tong rankings, in which it has moved up three places from last year, to equal 54th in the world and third in the Asia-Pacific.

The University is uniquely located on the fringe of the city of Melbourne’s central business district. It serves as a hub for the Parkville research precinct – one of the world’s leading centres of medical and biotechnological research – and is a vital part of surrounding neighbourhoods such as cosmopolitan Carlton.

About 50,000 of the best and brightest students from around the globe come to study at the University of Melbourne.

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Displaying 61 - 80 of 4022 articles

It’s been 50 years since the find of burnt bones in ancient soil, eroded from deep in shoreline dune in NSW. Jim Bowler

Time to honour a historical legend: 50 years since the discovery of Mungo Lady

It's been half a century since Jim Bowler discovered Mungo Lady which changed the course of Australian history. But now he says the find has fallen off the national radar, leaving a legacy of shame.
With some foul-mouthed words to Senator Sarah Hanson-Young, Senator David Leyonhjelm has turned a debate about the safety of women into a sleazy political sideshow. AAP/Mick Tsikas/Sam Mooy

Sexist abuse has a long history in Australian politics – and takes us all to a dark place

Many female politicians have had to endure sexist abuse, from Cheryl Kernot to Julia Gillard to Sarah Hanson-Young. And it is not a matter that should simply be brushed aside.
The existence of wormholes is not forbidden by our current theories of the universe. So we can say that they do exist in theory. Marcella Cheng/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Curious Kids: How do wormholes work?

A wormhole is like a tunnel connecting two places in space. They would be incredibly useful and are great for science-fiction stories. The problem is we haven't found any evidence of them existing.
While the federal government promotes the employment of older people through the jobactive network, in practice it’s not working well for them. Australian Government/jobactive

Employment services aren’t working for older jobseekers, jobactive staff or employers

A two-year study finds dissatisfaction with current arrangements, but also identifies small changes that can make a big difference in helping to find suitable jobs for older workers.
In a survey of 159 academics, nearly half reported sexual abuse or harassment. "Fight sexism": graffiti in Turin November 2016

Sexual abuse, harassment and discrimination ‘rife’ among Australian academics

Academics and PhD students from a number of Australian universities have reported sexualised bullying, unfair workloads, sexual harassment and in some cases even sexual assault, usually from their superiors and supervisors.
By the time they turn one, half of Australian babies have had a course of antibiotics. Shutterstock

Antibiotics before birth and in early life can affect long-term health

There may be additional long-term health harms from antibiotic exposure in early life and before birth, including an increased risk of infection, obesity and asthma.
In 1906, English statistician Sir Francis Galton observed the median answer of 800 participants trying to guess the weight of a cow was accurate within 1% of the correct answer. Mavis Wong/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

The internet is terrible at answering most tough questions. Our ‘wisdom of the crowd’ tool can help

We have developed a system that combines human intuition with machine learning to provide support for people making complex decisions.
Cocos Malay photo from the 1910s showing a wedding procession that is still practised today with the groom pictured going to the bride’s house accompanied by members of the community. Wikimedia Commons/From the book 'Coral reefs and islands' authored by Jones, F. Wood (Frederic Wood), 1879-1954, Published by Lovell Reeve & Co. , Ltd. London. Photo digitized by Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

A group of Southeast Asian descendants wants to be recognised as Indigenous Australians

In the 1800s, a group of Southeast Asians were taken to the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, now part of Australia, by an English merchant. Their descendants are seeking Indigenous status from Australia.
Foto Orang Kokos dari tahun 1910an di arak perkawinan yang masih dilakukan sampai sekarang, terlihat pengantin pria di foto dalam perjalanan ke rumah pengantin perempuan di dampingi sanak keluarga di Kepulauan Kokos. Wikimedia Commons/Dari buku 'Coral reefs and islands' penulis Jones, F. Wood (Frederic Wood), 1879-1954, Penerbit Lovell Reeve & Co. , Ltd. London. Digitasi foto oleh Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

Keturunan Melayu di Kepulauan Kokos perjuangkan pengakuan sebagai suku asli Australia

Pada 1800an, sekelompok Melayu dibawa ke Kepulauan Cocos (Keeling), sekarang bagian Australia. Keturunan mereka sekarang memperjuangkan status orang asli dari Australia.

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