University of Sheffield

The University of Sheffield has been named UK University of the Year in the 2011 Times Higher Education Awards.

Judges said that the University “stood out as a result of a strategy based on its values and rooted in its founding principles” and praised our “determination and grit” in focusing on our local community.

University guides also confirm our position as one of the UK’s leading universities. The 2010 Virgin Guide to British Universities says that “Sheffield is a top university across the board”.

Teaching quality assessments rate our teaching very highly across a wide range of subjects, and official research assessments confirm our reputation as a centre for world-class research in many disciplines.

We have nearly 25,000 students from 128 countries, and over 5,500 staff. The University of Sheffield is a popular choice with applicants for university places, and once they arrive our students enjoy the experience so much that many settle in Sheffield after they graduate.

Our research partners and clients include Boeing, Rolls Royce, Unilever, Boots, AstraZeneca, GSK, ICI, Slazenger, and many more household names, as well as UK and overseas government agencies and charitable foundations.

Our academic partners include leading universities around the world. International partnerships include Worldwide Universities Network (USA, Europe and China) and our partnership with Leeds and York Universities (the White Rose Consortium) has combined research power greater than that of either Oxford or Cambridge.

The University’s history stretches back to 1828, when the Sheffield School of Medicine was founded, and our University Charter was granted in 1905.

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Displaying 561 - 580 of 586 articles

Banged up: a Bill on prisoners’ voting rights is presently before parliament. PA Archive

Prisoners should not be locked out of democracy

The news that Peter Chester and George McGeoch have had their Supreme Court appeal against the ban on prison inmates voting dismissed will cause few people on the outside to lose much sleep - in fact the…
Those currency reserves must be somewhere, Mr President. White House

US shutdown opens the way for China in global currency markets

The US shutdown and the fractious struggles in Congress are symptomatic of a broader trend in American politics. In the aftermath of the global financial crisis, a new political landscape has emerged…
Toddling to the barricades. oudodou

Mexican elites worry as protestors evoke spirit of 68

On this day, 45 years ago, hundreds of peaceful protestors were massacred by the government in Mexico City. With worsening poverty, repressive government and no democratic outlet, all the conditions are…
Any snow-shovelling jobs going? quixotic54

Punitive Osborne offers job seekers nothing for something

There is still a year and a half to go, but the 2013 party conference season might be remembered as the moment the 2015 general election campaign unofficially got underway. Last week, Ed Miliband delivered…
Hands up for the environment. Cathal McNaughton/PA

Green NGOs cannot take big business cash and save planet

When she wrote recently that “big green groups” are doing more harm than good when it comes to saving the planet, Naomi Klein was was right to be concerned. In recent years the environmental agenda has…
Did I tell you the one about the cyclist I rescued? Stefan Rousseau/PA

Ed Miliband’s speech a lesson in split personality politics

Ed Miliband suffers from a split personality. When discussed in the abstract – in polls, on the street or in newspapers - the image conjured up is of a policy wonk who, like many politicians, is far from…
Anyone need a cash injection? Nick Ares

The regressive politics of quantitative easing

When financial markets stood on the verge of collapse in the summer of 2008, two of the world’s most important central banks, the US Federal Reserve and the Bank of England, began considering unorthodox…
Can you hear me - peas or chips for dinner? bbaltimore

Is brain to brain mind control possible?

The Headlines The Independent: First ever human brain-to-brain interface successfully tested BBC News: Are we close to making human ‘mind control’ a reality? Visual News: Mind Control is Now a Reality…
Anyone still voting for us? You there, at the back… Stefan Rousseau/PA

Lib Dems brace for a Glasgow kiss at party conference

As the Liberal Democrats descend on Glasgow for their party conference their attention is firmly focused on the forthcoming general election. With an average polling of just 11% and forecasts predicting…
Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto has changed his password. White House

NSA can’t decide if Mexico is friend or foe

Mexico is the latest country to be caught up in the NSA leaks story. It seems the agency had access to president Enrique Peña Nieto’s email account while he was running for office last year. The disclosure…
be b af c o.

Are classical music competitions judged on looks?

The headlines The Los Angeles Times: People trust eyes - not ears - when judging musicians Classic FM: Classical singers judged by actions not voice Nature: Musicians’ appearances matter more than their…
It will soon be legal to grow, sell and smoke cannabis in Uruguay. Cuau Guerra

What Uruguay’s legal weed means for the war on drugs

Uruguay is set to become the first country to legalise marijuana use, cultivation and possession following a century of often authoritarian prohibition laws across the globe. In a landmark vote on President…
Can British shores really attract more people than the Great Barrier Reef? USFWS Pacific

Cash from conservation zones doesn’t add up

What has nature ever done for us? This is what leading environmentalist Tony Juniper asks in his latest book. He wants us to account for the “ecosystem services” that nature freely provides in order to…
How many times do we have to try before we are able to repeat those results? Queen's University

Fraud and trouble with replication are chemistry’s problems too

Scientific fraud has raised its ugly head once more. In a note to chemists in the journal Organic Letters, Amos Smith, the editor-in-chief, has announced that an analysis of data submitted to the journal…
War on drugs: up to 100,000 people have been killed and 26,000 disappeared since 2006. Mateus via Creative Commons

Capture of Zetas boss creates job opportunity for a killer

The capture of Miguel Ángel Treviño Morales, the leader of the notorious drug cartel Los Zetas - one of the world’s most dangerous criminal organisations, will provide Enrique Peña Nieto’s Mexican government…
Joe Pemberton.

Do mobile phones lead to ‘digital dementia’?

The Headlines The Telegraph: Surge in ‘digital dementia’ The Daily Mail: ‘Digital dementia’ on the rise as young people increasingly rely on technology instead of their brain Fox News: Is ‘digital dementia…
Terminate your concerns. San Diego Shooter/Flickr

Super intelligent machines aren’t to be feared

Fear of machines becoming smarter than humans is a standard part of popular culture. In films like iRobot and Terminator, humans are usurped. Throughout history we can trace stories about humankind overreaching…
Without taking action we’ll soon see the back of many species. Chris Ison/PA

Are birds worth the billions?

Birdlife International’s new report recommends a US$80 billion increase in annual spending in order to fully protect important bird biodiversity areas. This surely poses the question: are birds really…

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