University of Sheffield

The University of Sheffield has been named UK University of the Year in the 2011 Times Higher Education Awards.

Judges said that the University “stood out as a result of a strategy based on its values and rooted in its founding principles” and praised our “determination and grit” in focusing on our local community.

University guides also confirm our position as one of the UK’s leading universities. The 2010 Virgin Guide to British Universities says that “Sheffield is a top university across the board”.

Teaching quality assessments rate our teaching very highly across a wide range of subjects, and official research assessments confirm our reputation as a centre for world-class research in many disciplines.

We have nearly 25,000 students from 128 countries, and over 5,500 staff. The University of Sheffield is a popular choice with applicants for university places, and once they arrive our students enjoy the experience so much that many settle in Sheffield after they graduate.

Our research partners and clients include Boeing, Rolls Royce, Unilever, Boots, AstraZeneca, GSK, ICI, Slazenger, and many more household names, as well as UK and overseas government agencies and charitable foundations.

Our academic partners include leading universities around the world. International partnerships include Worldwide Universities Network (USA, Europe and China) and our partnership with Leeds and York Universities (the White Rose Consortium) has combined research power greater than that of either Oxford or Cambridge.

The University’s history stretches back to 1828, when the Sheffield School of Medicine was founded, and our University Charter was granted in 1905.

Links

Displaying 561 - 574 of 574 articles

It will soon be legal to grow, sell and smoke cannabis in Uruguay. Cuau Guerra

What Uruguay’s legal weed means for the war on drugs

Uruguay is set to become the first country to legalise marijuana use, cultivation and possession following a century of often authoritarian prohibition laws across the globe. In a landmark vote on President…
Can British shores really attract more people than the Great Barrier Reef? USFWS Pacific

Cash from conservation zones doesn’t add up

What has nature ever done for us? This is what leading environmentalist Tony Juniper asks in his latest book. He wants us to account for the “ecosystem services” that nature freely provides in order to…
How many times do we have to try before we are able to repeat those results? Queen's University

Fraud and trouble with replication are chemistry’s problems too

Scientific fraud has raised its ugly head once more. In a note to chemists in the journal Organic Letters, Amos Smith, the editor-in-chief, has announced that an analysis of data submitted to the journal…
War on drugs: up to 100,000 people have been killed and 26,000 disappeared since 2006. Mateus via Creative Commons

Capture of Zetas boss creates job opportunity for a killer

The capture of Miguel Ángel Treviño Morales, the leader of the notorious drug cartel Los Zetas - one of the world’s most dangerous criminal organisations, will provide Enrique Peña Nieto’s Mexican government…
Joe Pemberton.

Do mobile phones lead to ‘digital dementia’?

The Headlines The Telegraph: Surge in ‘digital dementia’ The Daily Mail: ‘Digital dementia’ on the rise as young people increasingly rely on technology instead of their brain Fox News: Is ‘digital dementia…
Terminate your concerns. San Diego Shooter/Flickr

Super intelligent machines aren’t to be feared

Fear of machines becoming smarter than humans is a standard part of popular culture. In films like iRobot and Terminator, humans are usurped. Throughout history we can trace stories about humankind overreaching…
Without taking action we’ll soon see the back of many species. Chris Ison/PA

Are birds worth the billions?

Birdlife International’s new report recommends a US$80 billion increase in annual spending in order to fully protect important bird biodiversity areas. This surely poses the question: are birds really…
Hard hats at the ready: a Johnson-Osborne clash over transport funding may be a dress rehearsal for a much bigger fight ahead. Matt Dunham/PA Wire

Only one winner in the battle between Boris and Osborne

The clash between Boris Johnson and George Osborne over cuts to Transport for London’s budget, which would scupper the mayor’s 2020 vision for a cycling city, represents far more than an argument over…
polanri.

Is social psychology really in crisis?

The headlines Disputed results a fresh blow for social psychology Replication studies: Bad copy The story Controversy is simmering in the world of psychology research over claims that many famous effects…
Lonesome no more. George died on 24 June 2012. A.Davey

Stop singletons becoming endlings to save ecosystems

There can be few words as poignant as “endling”, the name given to the last surviving individual of a species. The picture (below) of Benjamin, the last Tasmanian tiger or thylacine, is heartbreaking…
dd eeb o.

Does brain stimulation make you better at maths?

The Headlines Brain stimulation promises “long-lasting” maths boost Mild electric shocks to brain may help students solve maths problems Electrical brain boost can make you better at maths What they actually…
In, out, in, out, shake it all about: debate over EU membership is coming to a head within the Conservative Party. Rock Cohen via Creative Commons

Time for pro-Europeans to stand up and be counted

Geoffrey Howe’s resignation speech in 1990, in which he cited differences with his prime minister over Europe, is generally credited with precipitating the fall of Margaret Thatcher. Now the Tory grandee…

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors