University of Sydney

Established in 1850, the University of Sydney was Australia’s first tertiary education institution. It is committed to maximising the potential of its students, teachers and researchers for the benefit of Australia and the wider world.

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Sport for Jove’s production of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice is now onstage in Sydney. Sport for Jove

Review: The Merchant of Venice, Shakespeare’s comedy of cruelty

Sport for Jove's The Merchant of Venice is a production of ourstanding clarity, making it ideal for students or perhaps even those who simply don’t often see Shakespeare in the theatre.
Two women walk in front of a billboard, which says “Ebola must go. Stopping Ebola is Everybody’s Business” in Monrovia, Liberia, January 15 2015. UNMEER/Emmanuel Tobey

The Ebola outbreak highlights shortcomings in disease surveillance and response – and where we can do better

Along with better strategies to respond to outbreaks in human populations, we need a stronger focus on surveillance in animals to identify infectious diseases before they pose a risk to human health.
Author Melina Marchetta is a guest at this year’s Sydney Writers' Festival. AAP Image/Penguin Group

A writer’s craft: a conversation with Melina Marchetta

"Wouldn’t it be fantastic if the English syllabus was made up of books that students love?" Australian author Melina Marchetta's novels have won her many devoted fans and she's passionate about engaging young people with literature.
Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha shows little sign of listening to growing public opposition to his military junta’s authoritarian rule. EPA

A year on, coup leaders rule with disdain for Thais and democracy

A year ago, a military coup toppled Thailand's elected government. The junta promised elections once a new constitution is adopted, but its authoritarian rule betrays a hostility to real democracy.
The current climate is inviting us to conceive of Baltimore as an example of Italian legal philosopher Giorgio Agamben’s ‘state of exception’. EPA/John Taggart

Reviewing Baltimore through Serial, The Wire and race riots

The current climate is inviting us to conceive of Baltimore not as a place where the law doesn’t work but, more radically, as an example of Italian legal philosopher Giorgio Agamben’s “state of exception".
You need to take a wider view to work out the true greenhouse emissions from nuclear power. Teollisuuden Voima Oy/Wikimedia Commons

Is nuclear power zero-emission? No, but it isn’t high-emission either

Nuclear power isn't 'zero-emission', as many proponents claim. Factor in uranium mining, power plant construction, and other factors and it has similar emissions to wind power. But that's still lower than fossil fuels.
If you need doctors to work in the country, you need a selection system that picks people with those values and commitments. University of Exeter/Flickr

Getting doctors to the bush depends on more than just uni places

Three features of a medical school help predict where medical students will eventually work as doctors: selection, the curriculum, and the professionalism of the newly-qualified doctors.
Much to talk about: Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang chat during a signing ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. EPA/Kenzaburo Fukuhara

India and China move closer as Modi tours ‘Act East’ policy

India wants closer engagement with its neighbours as it aspires to become a global manufacturing hub. Narendra Modi's visits to China, Mongolia and South Korea are all about promoting this agenda.
Giving constitutional status to an Indigenous advisory body would give Indigenous Australians a say about laws that directly affect them. AAp/Tracey Nearmy

Putting words to the tune of Indigenous constitutional recognition

Proposals for constitutional recognition of Indigenous people are gaining momentum but also raising legal concerns. Here is a form of words to create an advisory council that overcomes those concerns.

The End of Representative Politics?

The following notes on the future of democratic representation were inspired by Simon Tormey’s The end of representative politics (2015), launched at a Gleebooks event organised by the Sydney Democracy…
Reporter Scott McIntyre lost his job with SBS following several controversial tweets on Anzac Day – but does the Fair Work Act protect the right to political expression? Dave Hunt/AAP

Scott McIntyre vs SBS will test employees' right to be opinionated

Scott McIntyre's legal challenge against being sacked by SBS will be an interesting test of whether the Fair Work Act offers any safe haven for employees to maintain a personal and political identity.
Billions were expected to be saved from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme – but surprisingly the budget only outlines $252 million in savings. Lukas Coch/AAP

Federal Budget 2015: health experts react

The big surprise about this year’s health budget was what wasn’t there – billions of dollars in expected savings from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.
This Conservative Party leaflet kills three birds with one stone and is a classic example of Lynton Crosby’s campaign strategy. UK Conservative Party/Buzzfeed

Decoding the Crosby campaign: how to find voters and finish first

The British Conservative government’s re-election is the latest and perhaps most startling electoral triumph for Australian political strategist Lynton Crosby. So how did he do it?
In the hospitality sector, employers are 13 times more likely to prefer 457 visa workers than similar Australian workers, data shows. George Alexander Ishida Newman

Evidence of employers misusing 457 visas shows need for reform

New analysis shows that some employers readily admit they use 457 visa workers even when there is no skills shortage in their sector, suggesting that tougher regulation is needed.

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