University of Tasmania

Established in 1890, the University of Tasmania is the fourth oldest university in Australia. UTAS is committed to the creation, preservation, communication and application of knowledge, as well as excellence in all teaching, research and scholarly activities.


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Around 20% of Australians are not insured against disasters, and even a quarter of those who do may be under-covered. AAP Image/Jason Webster

Properties under fire: why so many Australians are inadequately insured against disaster

As the fire season returns, insurance claims against disasters will only increase. But new research suggests that under-insurance is a major problem facing many Australian households.
The fire season is well underway in southern Australia. AAP Image/Carolyn Sainty

How to prepare your home for a bushfire – and when to leave

Australians are still underprepared for bushfires. And with fire seasons getting longer thanks to climate change we need to look at why people are still dying in fires, and what you can do to get prepared.
Tesla has already gone beyond demonstrating its self-driving car to having such a vehicle travel across the United States. Reuters/Beck Diefenbach

‘Killer robots’ hit the road – and the law has yet to catch up

Unlike a driver, the way a self-driving car responds to emergencies is programmed –decided in advance. We need to sort out the legal questions of responsibility this raises, and soon.
Many marine reptiles like this nothosaur went extinct at the end of the Triassic, one of five major mass extinction events on Earth. Brian Choo

Elementary new theory on mass extinctions that wiped out life

A fall in vital trace elements in our oceans could be one of the driving forces behind a number of mass extinction events during Earth's history.
This common lionfish (Pterois volitans) was sighted more than 200km further south than expected down the NSW coast by 14-year-old scuba diver Georgia Poyner. It’s one of almost 40 verified observations she has submitted to Redmap. Redmap/Georgia Poyner

How you can help scientists track how marine life reacts to climate change

We know the warming seas are forcing some marine life to new waters, but we don't know much about how fast and how far they are moving. But now you can help scientists find the answers with Redmap.
Malcolm Turnbull’s relaxed and natural demeanour comes as a relief after Tony Abbott and Julia Gillard, except they were once like that too. AAP/David Moir

Can the ‘real Malcolm’ survive being PM?

Australians have seen their recent prime ministers lose the very qualities as communicators that took them to the top. Malcolm Turnbull's challenge is to avoid succumbing to the same fate.
The Great Southern Reef is unique, beautiful and contributes significantly to Australia’s culture and economy. However, few of us realise the magnitude and value of this gem right at our doorstep. T. Wernberg 2002

Australia’s ‘other’ reef is worth more than $10 billion a year - but have you heard of it?

The Great Southern Reef covers 71,000 square km and contributes more than A$10 billion to Australia's economy each year.
While Adam Goodes is the public face of the debate, almost any Indigenous Australian can speak of the day-by-day experience of a lack of respect for who they are. AAP/Paul Miller

White Australia needs to take responsibility for reconciliation too

For at least some Australians, it seems that Indigenous culture is acceptable only as an object of consumption for tourists visiting the remote north.
The cycles of nutrients into the oceans following the building of mountains may have been a prime driver of evolutionary change. John Long, Flinders University

Plate tectonics may have driven the evolution of life on Earth

The rise and fall of the essential elements for life could have influenced the way life evolved over many millions of years.
The real answer to what the economy might look like in 30-50 years is that none of us really know. Flickr/Bob McCaffrey

The new economy - how do we get there from here?

As Australia leaves the old economy behind, the word we must embrace for the new is "nimble".

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